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Reasons to Admire North Korea

Posted By Greg Paulson On November 28, 2010 @ 4:23 pm In North American New Right | Comments Disabled

[1]

Kim Jong Il portrait mug by Charles Krafft

853 words

Portuguese translation here [2]

Yes, I am a white racialist, and I admire North Korea. Let me explain.

North Korea—Not Communist

North Korea is not communist, plain and simple. Juche [3], the official state ideology of North Korea, can be roughly translated as “spirit of self-reliance.” Kim Jong Il, the Supreme Leader of North Korea, said the basis of Juche is the idea that “man is the master of everything and decides everything” [1].  Juche can also be understood as “always putting Korean things first.”[2] This is obviously more nationalist than communist. In 2009 North Korea officially stopped using the term communism to describe itself and removed it from the constitution. Additionally, they inserted the term “Songun [4]” into the constitution, which emphasizes the powerful position of the North Korean military in the government, and posits that it is model for society to emulate.

Militarism—Required for Independence

 

The most common criticism of North Korea is that it spends a huge amount on its military while its people starve.  The US government estimates that North Korea spends roughly a quarter of its GNP on the military.[3] This puts North Korea at the top of the list for proportional military spending. What people don’t seem to understand is that North Korea’s radical autarkist ideology—in other words, its refusal to bow to the international financial order (putting Korea first)—absolutely requires that national defense be put first. Without a powerful military North Korea could not exist. So yes, North Korea accepts what little aid it can get and has struggled to adequately feed some portions of its population, but that is the price of independence for them, and they are willing to pay it—and for that alone the North Koreans get my respect. Whatever you can say about the North Koreans, you cannot say they are weak. Their will is strong, and they seem willing to die to maintain their independence.

Another misconception is that North Korea is a puppet state somehow controlled by China. Although historically China had great influence on North Korea, the relationship has been strained in recent decades, and North Korea has made it clear that it is no puppet state. China continues to be North Korea’s sole ally because of lucrative trade,[4] historic friendship, and the fact that North Korea, were it desperate enough, could be very problematic for China. There is no doubt that China enjoys some influence, but North Korea remains a firmly independent nation.  If this isn’t made clear enough by their ultra-nationalism, their ethnocentrism surely drives it home.

North Korea—Racist?

 

According to B. R. Myers, the North Korean ideology maintains that “the Korean people are too pure-blooded, and so too virtuous to survive in this evil world without a great parental leader.”[5] He also asserts that in addition to feeling that foreign races are inferior, the North Korean government “occasionally criticizes the Jews’ influence on world affairs.”[6] Following in the footsteps of hyper-nationalist movements of the past, the North Korean government has established the belief that its people are uniquely intelligent, strong-willed, and superior in many ways to foreign races. The Japanese (their close racial cousins), had very similar beliefs before being defeated in the Second World War. Myers actually believes the Koreans adopted their racial beliefs from the “fascist Japanese” during Japan’s occupation of Korea. Regardless of their claims of superiority, or from whom they might have borrowed it, the average North Korean IQ of 105 is one of the highest in the world.[7] South Korea is reported to have an average IQ one point higher, at 106, which is almost certainly due to the population having greater access to resources. Keep in mind the severe sanctions North Korea is operating under.

While I don’t agree with the extent of the state-control of the economy in North Korea (i.e. controlling consumption), I certainly have no loyalty to the capitalist system, which I see as racially corrosive, among other things. And let us not forget the whole reason the United States got involved in the Korean civil war was to defend (or impose) capitalism and by extension the ruling international financial order.

Essentially I admire North Korea because it is in direct opposition to the hostile ruling elite in the West and the globalist destruction of distinct peoples and nations. North Korea is the only ethno-nationalist state opposing the current world order, and as long as it exists, it will stand as an example (and a possible future ally) for ethnic and racial nationalists everywhere, especially those of us in the West who see the only hope for our people in the destruction of the current world order.

Notes

1. “On the Juche Idea,” The People’s Korea 31, March 1982: 11. http://www1.korea-np.co.jp/pk/ [5]

2. Bruce Cummings, Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History (New York: W.W. Norton, 2005), p. 414..

3. “North Korea .” U.S. Department of State, September 29,. 2010, http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2792.htm [6]

4. Keith B. Richburg, “In Chinese border town, trade with North Korea can be lucrative but problematic,” Washington Post, November 26, 2010, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/26/AR2010112602307.html [7]

5. Richburg, 2.

6. Richburg, 2.

7. Richard Lynn and Tatu Vanhanen. “Richard Lynn—Intelligence and the Wealth and Poverty of Nations,” http://www.rlynn.co.uk [8]

 


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URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.counter-currents.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Krafft_leavitt_kim_jong_il_mug_far4.jpg

[2] here: http://www.counter-currents.com/2012/02/motivos-para-admirar-a-coreia-do-norte/

[3] Juche: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juche

[4] Songun: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songun

[5] http://www1.korea-np.co.jp/pk/: http://www1.korea-np.co.jp/pk/

[6] http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2792.htm: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2792.htm

[7] http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/26/AR2010112602307.html: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/26/AR2010112602307.html

[8] http://www.rlynn.co.uk: http://www.rlynn.co.uk

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