Print this post Print this post

Violence & “Soft Commerce,” Part 2

714 words

Part 2 of 3

Translated by Greg Johnson

The Internal Logic of “Soft Commerce”

Now that “soft commerce” has been globalized since the end of the 20th century, one must grant that it has the advantage of a plasticity and a capacity for survival enjoyed by few regimes up to the present.

“Soft commerce” is sheathed in abstract concepts like “capitalism” or “liberalism.” But because those have been used for so many indigestible cuisines, their significance is exhausted. Another concept, more recent, is “cosmocracy.” It was coined by American authors and was taken up again by Samuel Huntington in his last book Who are We?[1] I myself have used it. It is explicit. It suggests the character that the globalist oligarchy acquired little by little since the 1960s.[2]

But let us return for a moment to the internal logic of “soft commerce.” What is its goal?  It is the individual financial profit of the capitalist, regardless of the cost to others. Having become dominant in our societies, this objective was promoted to the rank of supreme value, justifying everything, in particular what was at once condemned by common sense and the most elementary social morals. In the Communist Manifesto of 1848, Karl Marx aptly described the unlimited destructive power of the system that he called “bourgeois,” even though the personal behavior of many bourgeois individuals contradicted his thesis. Recall his famous lines:

Everywhere where it seizes power, the bourgeoisie trampled underfoot feudal, patriarchal, and idyllic relations. All the complex and varied ties which linked feudal man to his natural superiors, were mercilessly shattered so that no other tie remained between men but cold self-interest. . . . This constant social upheaval, this agitation, and this perpetual insecurity distinguish the bourgeois era from all preceding ones.

Marx was delighted by soft commerce’s constant pressures against the old European order. In this eyes, they presaged the advent of post-bourgeois society, i.e., of the communist utopia. They presaged a homogenized world and the end of history with a capital “H.” Marx was almost right. He just needed this nuance: “Soft commerce” has ultimately showed itself to be far more durable, although no less perverse, than the communist utopia, some aspirations of which it carries out by other means.

The Convergence between Communism and “Soft Commerce”

The convergence of the two systems was remarkably analyzed by Flora Montcorbier in a wrongfully forgotten book.[3] Economist and philosopher, with a vigorous clarity, she gives us a key to plausibly interpreting the organized chaos that replaced our traditional societies.

No one before her cared to understand the curious outcome of the cold war, the great upheaval. Exactly who won on this fake war? The United States, of course, and “soft commerce.” But also their common religion, the religion of Humanity (with a capital “H”), one, uniform, and universal. And it was not their only affinity.

What did the Communists want? They wanted a planned management of the wealth of humanity. They also wanted the creation of a new man, a rational and universal man, freed of the “obstacles” of roots, nature, and culture. They wanted, finally, to satisfy their hatred of concrete men, the bearers of difference; their hatred of old Europe, multiple and tragic.

And “soft commerce,” in other words, the American West, what did it want?[4] Pretty much the same thing. The differences were in their methods. Rejecting planning and forced collectivism (terror), “soft commerce” sees the financial market as the principal factor of economic rationality and the desired changes.

“Soft commerce,” another name for globalism, does not only share its radiant vision of the final goal with its Soviet brother and former enemy. To change the world, it must also change man, manufacture the Homo oeconomicus of the future, the zombie, the New Man: homogeneous, empty, possessed by the spirit of the universal and unlimited market. The zombie is happy. Happiness consists in satisfying all his desires, the desires caused by the market.

Notes

1. Samuel P. Huntington, Who Are We: The Challenges to America’s National Identity (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2005).

2. Dominique Venner, Le Siècle de 1914 (Paris: Pygmalion, 2006), ch. 10.

3. Flora Montcorbier, Le Communisme de marché [Communism and the Market] (Paris: L’Age d’Homme, 2000).

4. We do not confuse the “Western-American system” with Americans taken individually, who often suffer from it.

Source: http://www.dominiquevenner.fr/#/doux-commerce/3272231

If you enjoyed this piece, and wish to encourage more like it, give a tip through Paypal. You can earmark your tip directly to the author or translator, or you can put it in a general fund. (Be sure to specify which in the "Add special instructions to seller" box at Paypal.)
This entry was posted in North American New Right and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

One Comment

  1. Justin Huber
    Posted November 23, 2010 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    Good article. I had a similar thought the other day. Communism and the dictatorship of the proletariat may be gone, but Capitalism and the dictatorship of bourgeoisie seems to be alive and well.

  • Video of the Day:

  • Kindle Subscription
  • Our Titles

    New Right vs. Old Right

    Lost Violent Souls

    Journey Late at Night: Poems and Translations

    The Non-Hindu Indians & Indian Unity

    Baader Meinhof ceramic pistol, Charles Kraaft 2013

    The Lightning and the Sun

    Jonathan Bowden as Dirty Harry

    The Lost Philosopher, Second Expanded Edition

    Trevor Lynch's A White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    And Time Rolls On

    The Homo & the Negro

    Artists of the Right

    North American New Right, Vol. 1

    Forever and Ever

    Some Thoughts on Hitler

    Tikkun Olam and Other Poems

    Under the Nihil

    Summoning the Gods

    Hold Back This Day

    The Columbine Pilgrim

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater

    Taking Our Own Side

    Toward the White Republic

    Distributed Titles

    Fascism viewed from the Right

    Notes on the Third Reich

    Morning Crafts

    New Culture, New Right

    An eagle with a shield soaring upwards

    A Life in the Political Wilderness

    The Fourth Political Theory

    The Passing of the Great Race

    The Passing of a Profit & Other Forgotten Stories

    Fighting for the Essence

    The Arctic Home in the Vedas

    The Prison Notes

    It Cannot Be Stormed

    Revolution from Above

    The Proclamation of London

    Beyond Human Rights

    The WASP Question

    Can Life Prevail?

    The Jewish Strategy

    The Metaphysics of War

    A Handbook of Traditional Living

    The French Revolution in San Domingo

    The Revolt Against Civilization

    Why We Fight

    The Problem of Democracy

    The Path of Cinnabar

    Archeofuturism

    Tyr

    Siege

    On Being a Pagan

    The Lost Philosopher

    The Dispossessed Majority

    Might is Right

    Impeachment of Man

    Gold in the Furnace

    Defiance