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Islamism: Putting the Right to Shame

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2018 qualifications: While I still stand by the general points made in this essay, both the world and me personally are very different from what they were in 2011. First, I am less certain about 9/11 not being an “inside job” than I was then. I’m still not a Truther, but I have since come across some compelling evidence that can’t easily be explained away, such as regarding insider trading on the stock market prior to 9/11, so I am open to the possibility. Also, I wrote this long before the rise of ISIS, which is more of a caricature of a Traditionalist political movement than an actual one, and it has clearly been a vector for neoliberal geopolitical designs rather than anything truly revolutionary, not to mention the deaths of many innocent Europeans and Americans — as such, given that it has been the most prominent Islamist movement of recent years, it’s difficult to continue to tell Rightists to look to Islamism for inspiration. Moreover, in 2011 it seemed like “the movement,” such as it was, would be forever stuck on the margins of society; like everyone else, I didn’t anticipate the changes in the political landscape that would take place in Europe and the US over the past few years. Because of this, I no longer think that a militant, ideological, unified organization is what is needed right now; that sentiment was born out of the idea that we were already permanently locked out of the political process, and while we still are far from insiders, the situation is certainly much more hopeful now than it was then. So while I don’t renounce this essay, it’s not something I would write today, and should be seen as a product of its time.

So much has been written and said about September 11 over the last decade from every conceivable perspective that it’s difficult to think of a theme that won’t seem trite.I could write about 9/11 as a consequence of American foreign policy, or as a symptom of the Islamic threat to the West, or in terms of America’s relationship to Israel, or its effect on domestic politics and culture, or about its role in fulfilling the neoconservative imperialist wish-list. But you’ve read all this before and I have nothing new to add to it. So what I will discuss instead are my own personal reflections on the event.

What I will establish right off the bat is that I do not subscribe to the idea that 9/11 was an “inside job.” While I do not deny that the attack gave the American military-industrial complex and its political allies enormous opportunities, I have seen no evidence that has convinced me that any part of the United States government or defense establishment was actively complicit.

Also, knowing how ineffective and chaotic any political establishment is, and the desires of its warring factions to make the others look bad, it would be impossible for such a large-scale conspiracy to remain a secret for very long. It didn’t take long after the Iraq War began for officials to come forward with their own information on the actual conspiracies that went on behind the scenes to make the war happen. If 9/11 had been a conspiracy, somebody, sooner or later, would have come forward with evidence.

As for President Bush, he was a man who was almost killed by a pretzel — not exactly the kind of person one can imagine as a linchpin of the greatest black-ops achievement in history. Not to mention that one can trace the history of modern Islamism from its origins in the wake of the collapse of the Ottoman Caliphate in the 1920s up to the present day, and when viewed within this context, the eventual emergence of something like al Qaeda seems inevitable. (If you are a believer in some permutation of the conspiracy idea, please don’t try to persuade me. I’ve spent enough time on that over the last decade.)

Another idea to which I do not adhere is that 9/11 was a sign of a coming, apocalyptic showdown with the Islamic world. Ten years on, it cannot be denied that there has not been a single attack which even approaches its scope or drama. Those who saw it as a sign of an imminent onslaught now appear as foolish as those who thought that the Oklahoma City bombing was the clarion call of a militia uprising throughout the United States.

The fact is that the majority of Muslims have not been responsive to al Qaeda’s message. The revolutions which have swept through the Islamic world in recent months have been the result of other political pressures, including mainstream Islamism, and al Qaeda has found itself left out in the cold by these developments.

In any society, the majority of people are peace-loving and simply want to get on with their lives. They do not want constant chaos and violence in their midst. The Islamic world is no different. Likewise, it is not a monolithic bloc. The various governments of the Islamic world hate each other more than us, and each is subject to very different social circumstances and pressures. One cannot say much about Qatar and Afghanistan in the same breath with any meaning. Any generalizing statement that one makes about the Islamic world is ultimately incomplete.

Therefore, the idea that they are all heading towards unifying into a Caliphate and attacking the West (which they would be doomed to lose) is ludicrous. The only genuine threat that the Islamic world represents for the West — more Europe than the U.S. — is from immigration, which has continued unabated in the background behind the empty alarmism over terrorism.

So what is the ultimate meaning of 9/11? For me, the most interesting lesson of the last ten years has been the strength of Islamism as a political and social force.

Like many people, I knew next to nothing about it prior to that day apart from what distortions I’d picked up from the media. Once the initial anger subsided, I thought to myself, “WHY did this happen? What are these people trying to achieve?” I knew that 19 men could not be persuaded to fly planes into buildings without some rationale, no matter how bizarre it might seem to me.

So, on September 12, I went to the library to read up on this movement, and what I found out was quite surprising. I had been expecting to find a bloodthirsty and alien ideology in opposition to everything I believed in. What I actually found was a system of ideas which contained many elements with which I could sympathize, even if I abhorred the techniques used by some of its proponents. Indeed, there was much in their beliefs which resembled the critiques of modern society that I had read in Rightist and traditionalist authors.

But more importantly, as someone who had already been studying the Right for a number of years prior, I recognized immediately that here was a movement that had achieved things on a scale on an entirely different magnitude in comparison with the pitiful efforts our own colleagues have put forward in recent decades. If someone were to survey the last 60 years of European and American history, the true Right would amount to little more than a footnote detailing the various failed attempts to stem the tide of liberalism and modernity. In contrast, the Islamists have become a vital force with wide appeal and influence which has reshaped the societies in which they live.

While Al Qaeda seems to be gradually passing out of the pages of history, the impact it has had on our world, considering its size, has been staggering. A group of no more than a few hundred highly determined men, admittedly with a sizeable sum of money at their disposal, succeeded in embroiling the greatest superpower in modern history in two extremely bloody, expensive, and vicious wars (and several other, smaller ones), with no end in sight.

Granted, they have failed to achieve any of their other goals, and there has not been a single successful Islamist revolution in the last decade anywhere. Indeed, the al Qaeda strategist Abu Mus’ab al-Suri, the nom de guerre of Mustafa Sethmarian Nasar, wrote in his massive tome Global Islamic Resistance Call that he regarded 9/11 as a strategic error, since the forces of Islamism were not yet prepared for full-scale conflict with the West in 2001, and in fact he lamented that it resulted in the loss of the only safe haven from which they could safely organize and prepare their troops: Afghanistan.

Al-Suri, as well as another Islamist strategist, Abu Bakr Naji, have favored a slower process of stoking conflict, education, training, and recruiting and building support throughout the Muslim world. Still, al-Suri credited bin Laden with bringing the war against the primary enemy of the Islamists to the doorstep of the United States, and diverting attention away from secondary conflicts with Israel and the various domestic struggles in which Islamism before 2001 had frequently found itself distracted.[1]

Whether anything can be rescued of this strategy of gradualism from the ashes of the decimated first generation of al Qaeda and the recent transformation of the Middle Eastern political environment remains to be seen (and it may be years or decades before we know with any certainty).

Regardless of its achievements, or lack thereof, we should recognize in the spirit of the al Qaeda warriors a faith and a determination which our own “movement,” if it even deserves that name, is sorely lacking. Many Islamists do not hesitate to sacrifice their careers, their safety, and often their lives for the sake of the cause in which they believe. When an Islamist commits, it is a total commitment unto death, and comes before all other concerns.

Since 1945, with a few notable exceptions, we have rarely seen such a dedicated revolutionary vanguard among the ranks of the Right, which tends to be dominated by people who are only revolutionaries insofar as it does not endanger their bourgeois lives and reputations. We could learn something from the Islamists’ example.

I am not a sympathizer with Islamism. As someone of European descent who lives in India, two areas which are under constant threat from the onslaught of Islam, I have no desire to live under the “new Caliphate.”

As a Traditionalist, I do recognize the validity of Islam as a manifestation of the ultimate metaphysical reality, although I think it is obvious that the Islam which adheres to the doctrines of the Primordial Tradition in today’s world is embodied in certain forms of Sufism, and not by its simplistic arguments and the black-and-white Manichean views of radical Islamism, which lacks the esoteric component that Guénon recognized must exist to sustain a healthy spiritual tradition.[2]

Sayyid Qutb

Still, it cannot be denied that our Right shares many of the same concerns as the Islamists, particularly in terms of the degenerative impact of modern culture on civilization and the role that American, Jewish, and other imperialistic power interests have in continuing and exacerbating the trend. For philosophical and ideological evidence, one need look no further than the primary ideologue of modern Islamism, the Egyptian martyr Sayyid Qutb.[3]

But for inspiration from Islamism, I would not look primarily to al Qaeda, but rather to those Islamist groups which have been much more successful in achieving their goals.

I think Rightists could learn a lot from the example of the Lebanese HizbAllah and the Palestinian Hamas, rather than wasting their time with studying failed movements from our own ranks such as Mosley’s, Rockwell’s, GRECE’s, or David Duke’s (not that they aren’t worth studying, but they are more examples of what not to do, in practical terms, than examples to follow), or movements which have nothing in common with what we actually want to achieve, like the Tea Party.

Both HizbAllah and Hamas are groups which began as little more than ragtag bands of terrorists, but after years of determined struggle established themselves as central to the political lives of their respective societies.

One mistake that Rightists frequently make is to put too much emphasis on the negative: we tend to only talk about what we oppose, and point our fingers at our enemies, and some of us even get tempted into blind (and ultimately futile) militancy. Since 1945, nowhere in Europe or North America has the Right offered anything constructive, nor much of a viable vision of the future apart from utopian daydreaming.

HizbAllah and Hamas have certainly engaged in militancy — quite successfully, I might add, as HizbAllah is the only force which has succeeded in defeating Israel, not just once but twice (the first being forcing Israel’s withdrawal from southern Lebanon in 2000, and again in the summer of 2006 when they thwarted Israel’s attempts to root them out permanently). But militancy alone is insufficient.

HizbAllah and Hamas have been successful because they integrated themselves into the lives of their peoples by taking heed of their immediate needs and answering them. Today their support is such that they have both successfully competed with their opponents in the democratic process and become a part of the central government. They built their reputations as much on their social services as their battlefield victories by providing food, hospitals, and schools. They assisted in building and reconstructing homes when needed. They also established networks of followers to assist in these efforts in every town and neighborhood.[4]

People are much more likely to take your ideas seriously, and thus give you money, vote for your ticket, or sacrifice their lives for you when your group has helped to feed them and educate their kids, or when their brothers and sisters belong to one of your organizations.

I realize this will take a large investment of resources, and perhaps even the combined forces of the Right, which has never demonstrated much of an ability to work in unison, are insufficient for this task, but I see little hope for success for the true Right unless we begin engaging in, and committing our personal time and wealth, to develop such groups in our own nations and our own communities on the local level (since that’s where any movement must begin). And when has there been more of a need for such groups in the United States than today, when so many people are in desperate need? There is an opportunity before us that is going completely to waste.

There are many other lessons that one can take away from 9/11, but along with the usual rhetoric I urge readers to take a moment to view the phenomenon of Islamism from the other side. Read a book. A truly knowledgeable person must be willing to learn from as diverse a range of sources as possible. I myself try to keep up with the literature by and about Islamism as I find much food for thought there. If you can bring yourself to look at it objectively with a cool head, you may be surprised at what you can learn from it, both ideologically and practically.

Notes

[1] Readers interested in al Qaeda’s strategic thought are urged to consult two excellent volumes: Architect of Global Jihad by Brynjar Lia, which is a biography of al-Suri plus substantial translated excerpts from Global Islamic Resistance Call, and A Terrorist’s Call to Global Jihad edited by Jim Lacey, which is a 200-page summary of al-Suri’s 1,000-page tome. Harvard University has also translated Abu Bakr Naji’s work, The Management of Savagery, and it is available free of charge on-line as a PDF at www.wcfia.harvard.edu/olin/images/Management%20of%20Savagery%20-%2005-23-2006.pdf.

[2] Little-known but particularly interesting from a Rightist perspective is the Sufi Shaykh Ian Dallas, aka Abdalqadir as-Sufi, who today runs his Order from South Africa. Dallas, a Scotsman who formerly wrote scripts for the BBC and hobnobbed with the likes of Federico Fellini (he has a bit part as the magician in 8½), Edith Piaf, R. D. Laing, Eric Clapton (he gave Clapton a copy of the Persian Sufi fable Layla and Majnun, which inspired Clapton’s song of the same name), George Harrison, and Bob Dylan (who, in 1967, called him the only “interesting man in England”), became a Sufi during a visit to Morocco in 1967, and for decades since he has written many books and essays which integrate ideas and themes which he openly takes from Conservative Revolutionary thinkers such as Ernst Juenger (for whom he organized a symposium during the 1980s) and Carl Schmitt, as well as from Friedrich Nietzsche, Richard Wagner, and National Socialism. He has also attempted to formulate a unique form of political Islamism which bears little relation to what goes by that name elsewhere and which synthesizes many elements from the European tradition. He even advocates a new economic system for the Islamic world based on the Islamic gold dinar. His official Web site is at www.shaykhabdalqadir.com.

[3] Sayyid Qutb’s writings are voluminous, including a massive commentary on the Qur’an, but a good starting place is his short work Milestones, which can be downloaded for free as a PDF from forums.islamicawakening.com/f17/e-book-milestones-special-edition-by-maktabah-13171/. As a critic of modernity and democracy, I believe that Qutb is as interesting as any European or American thinker, even if one disagrees with his ultimate conclusions.

[4] Two excellent works which show everything which went into getting these movements to where they are today are Shaykh Naim Qassem’s Hizbullah: The Story from Within, and Azzam Tamimi’s Hamas: The Story from Within. Shaykh Qassem’s perspective is particularly interesting as he has been active in a leading role in HizbAllah since its origins during the Lebanese Civil War in 1982. Some may wonder at how applicable the lessons from Lebanon could be to our own situation, but Lebanon is a highly modernized and Westernized nation in which a wide variety of communities are constantly in competition for power, not unlike our own. Therefore it is not so alien, and will become even less so as the United States will come to more and more resemble a Third World plantation in the years ahead.

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20 Comments

  1. Posted September 11, 2015 at 9:33 pm | Permalink

    Both Hezballah and Hamas make me think of the key concept of local control and organizing cultural/racial/religious groups on a community level. To be a strong community even when surrounded by diversity as in Lebanon is an appealing idea. More than anything else, the modern individual is looking for belonging, identity, to be more than just an individual. If we offer that, people will respond.

    Q.

  2. Ulric
    Posted September 13, 2011 at 6:48 am | Permalink

    Since you are based in India, isn’t there an example of counter-power closer to home, namely the BJP and it’s offshoots, and perhaps other Hindu nationalist formations? I know they haven’t been entirely successful, but as you note, neither have the Islamists.

    • Posted September 13, 2011 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

      Ulric, I do find the BJP, RSS, Shiv Sena, etc. very interesting. However, while I think their efforts are worthwhile and, as a Hindu myself, I support them, these are more conventional political parties which are trying to work within, and therefore accommodate, the system than groups looking for real, top-to-bottom social change. Most Hindus who are serious about their religion will admit that what they are calling for is not nearly radical enough. So, yes, there are lessons to be learned there, but I’m not sure if that’s exactly the model to try to recreate.

  3. Fourmyle of Ceres
    Posted September 12, 2011 at 9:22 pm | Permalink

    John Morgan in blockquote:

    People are much more likely to take your ideas seriously, and thus give you money, vote for your ticket, or sacrifice their lives for you when your group has helped to feed them and educate their kids, or when their brothers and sisters belong to one of your organizations.

    Just so.

    I realize this will take a large investment of resources, and perhaps even the combined forces of the Right, which has never demonstrated much of an ability to work in unison, are insufficient for this task, but I see little hope for success for the true Right unless we begin engaging in, and committing our personal time and wealth, to develop such groups in our own nations and our own communities on the local level (since that’s where any movement must begin). And when has there been more of a need for such groups in the United States than today, when so many people are in desperate need? There is an opportunity before us that is going completely to waste.

    I have been thinking about this in the context of the living foundation of the nation organizing along Racial lines in a Northwest Republic. So many of the extant institutions are failing, and will continue to fail. This presents an opportunity.

    As Harold Covington said, we have always thought too small. His conception for the Northwest Republic uses that as a starting point (!). Yet, such efforts requires a temporal bridge to the transcendent, and that means a new religion, a Christianity based on what Christianity SHOULD have been – like Islam, Masculine, and Patriarchal. My comments on this are a matter of record on the blog.

    We can learn from the Jehovah’s Witnesses, who are organized in developing parallel systems of governance, and training their people in such principles of governance. We can also learn from the Christian Fundamentalists who are organizing home schooling programs, and from that, to more, as we can see in the example of the megachurches.

    We can simply and effectively participate in such movements, knowing that the Racial issue never need be directly addressed with them, as the most segregated place in America is church, particularly during activities during the week. De facto, the first element we would want – Racial homogeneity – is in place. All we need do then is lead by quietly effective example, making sure we offer solutions to problems that people experience in their daily lives.

    By simply remaking our lives in the fulfillment of the transcendent, we will make the realization of the implicate Order – in this case, a Racial Homeland – possible, as the bricks needed for the foundation will have been built over years of disciplined efforts. We have a Better Idea, and people will follow that. Douglas Mackinnon, a Conservative political activist with very reputable political credentials (DoD, White House), ends his book, “America’s Last Days,” with Wyoming and Montana (NORTHWEST!) being turned over to local political command, forming a new NATION called Jefferson. This was followed by “hundreds of thousands of Americans” fleeing to this new nation at top speed.

    The linkage between this and Islam? Glad you asked.

    Islam, essentially, divides the world into two groups, “Us,” and “Those Who Are Not Yet Us.” This incredible sense of confidence comes from the certainty that their lives are being spent in the fulfillment of a transcendental destiny. What has been stolen from us is that sense of, well, Manifest Destiny, and the joyous duty of fulfilling that destiny. THAT is in good measure what inspired the people who followed Joseph Smith to the Mormon Church, transforming swampland into the very successful city of Nauvoo, a city that was larger than Chicago. It then inspired the tremendous challenging Trek of ’47, where the Mormons fled horrific persecution – genocide! – to find the fulfillment of their destiny of greatness in the desolate, middle-of-nowhere- Salt Lake Valley.

    The linkage with Islam, and its application to us, is obvious. The same principles worked across cultures, both beginning with new models of social organization; Islam, with the Koran and its Laws that brought certainty and fairness to social organization within the Islamic Community, and the LSD Church, with its book of Mormon (theology) and Doctrines and Covenants (temporal social organization), carried out by the Orders of The Priesthood, complemented by the efforts of the women of the Relief Society. No women priests there!

    So, something like Islam in terms of radical and effective change – new religion, new nation, new state, new social systems and models of social organization – took place in America. The idea that a new country can be Created by us as a new wineskin for the new wine that we are trying to be, has tremendous support among the Race. Mackinnon’s book cites one metaexample. Many microexamples can be seen by the growth of Suburbia, as one the Race fled from what threatened all they worked for.

    Perhaps, one day, this piece might have a companion piece – “A Positive Theory of Race, Putting the Right to Shame.” In the meanwhile, we have Harold Covington’s Northwest Republic novels to start with. That’s a very good place to start.

    What’s In YOUR Future? Focus Northwest!

  4. Posted September 11, 2011 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

    Leaving 9/11 aside, there is much food for thought in this article. Ideas that have been in the back of my mind for some time are coming to the surface.

    First of all, the illustration that goes with the article is beautiful and inspiring. The alt tag is “Islamic-Tile-work-mosque”. We, the so-called “Right”, have nothing comparable. Compare this picture with Harold Arthur McNeill’s paintings!

    Islam is, as you say, a manifestation of the ultimate metaphysical reality. The “Right” is not. Neither is liberalism. If Europeans are going to get their act together, we are going to have to be grounded in metaphysical reality. There is no substitute for this. I started to say “A movement that is not grounded in metaphysical reality will have no force. It will crumble.” – but I should say a *civilization* that is not grounded. Never mind movements. Focusing on the movement puts the cart before the horse.

    HizbAllah and Hamas have been successful because they integrated themselves into the lives of their peoples by taking heed of their immediate needs and answering them. Today their support is such that they have both successfully competed with their opponents in the democratic process and become a part of the central government. They built their reputations as much on their social services as their battlefield victories by providing food, hospitals, and schools. They assisted in building and reconstructing homes when needed. They also established networks of followers to assist in these efforts in every town and neighborhood.

    People are much more likely to take your ideas seriously, and thus give you money, vote for your ticket, or sacrifice their lives for you when your group has helped to feed them and educate their kids, or when their brothers and sisters belong to one of your organizations.

    I realize this will take a large investment of resources, and perhaps even the combined forces of the Right, which has never demonstrated much of an ability to work in unison, are insufficient for this task, but I see little hope for success for the true Right unless we begin engaging in, and committing our personal time and wealth, to develop such groups in our own nations and our own communities on the local level (since that’s where any movement must begin). And when has there been more of a need for such groups in the United States than today, when so many people are in desperate need? There is an opportunity before us that is going completely to waste.

    Yes, but the thing is, Islam was there first, and then HizbAllah and Hamas appeared. We, the “Right” – I put that in quotes because I’m not sure what it is, or whether I am part of it – cannot just go out and emulate their tactics. Islam can only be opposed by something comparable to itself: a religion in the full sense of the word.

    • Posted September 11, 2011 at 8:59 pm | Permalink

      Lyle, you are the only commentator so far who seems to have grasped what I was actually trying to get people to think about with this essay. Thank you.

      • Posted September 13, 2011 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

        Thanks for a thought provoking article, John. I know how disheartening it is when I write something, and nobody gets it.

        However I am having second thoughts about what I said the other day. Sometimes I think Islam is a spent force. They are living off their capital. At this stage of history Islam is no more grounded than anything else. Islam is like Wiley E. Coyote, running off the cliff into thin air, not (yet) realizing that there is no ground under his feet. Thirty years ago, Communism seemed to be indestructible. It wasn’t. Thirty years from now the world will be very different.

    • Fourmyle of Ceres
      Posted September 11, 2011 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

      John Morgan in blockquote:

      They built their reputations as much on their social services as their battlefield victories by providing food, hospitals, and schools. They assisted in building and reconstructing homes when needed. They also established networks of followers to assist in these efforts in every town and neighborhood.

      So did the NSDAP. The demoralized on our side never mention this, or the importance of building networks of supporters by building a parallel Institutions that work, when the status quo obviously doesn’t, and never will.

      What’s In YOUR Future? Focus Northwest!

      • Posted September 12, 2011 at 9:14 am | Permalink

        Fourmyle: exactly. While I don’t regard the NSDAP as my ideal, it was certainly the last “Rightist” movement which actually understood what needs to go into a successful social movement.

  5. Posted September 11, 2011 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    I have seen no evidence that has convinced me that any part of the United States government or defense establishment was actively complicit.

    The evidence is abundant and overwhelming. You can start here:

    http://www.patriotsquestion911.com/#Hordon

    Robin Hordon is a former FAA Air Traffic Controller at the Boston Air Route Traffic Control Center. He says:

    I knew within hours of the attacks on 9/11/2001 that it was an inside job. Based on my 11-year experience as an FAA Air Traffic Controller in the busy Northeast corridor, including hundreds of hours of training, briefings, air refuelings, low altitude bombing drills, being part of huge military exercises, daily military training exercises, interacting on a routine basis directly with NORAD radar personnel, and based on my own direct experience dealing with in-flight emergency situations, including two instances of hijacked commercial airliners, I state unequivocally; There is absolutely no way that four large commercial airliners could have flown around off course for 30 to 60 minutes on 9/11 without being intercepted and shot completely out of the sky by our jet fighters unless very highly placed people in our government and our military wanted it to happen.

    More evidence can be found here:

    http://www.ae911truth.org/ — Architects and Engineers for 9/11 truth. This site contains no theories at all about who did what. It simply focuses on flaws in the official version of what happened. The idea that 9/11 was an inside job is an *inference* at this stage of the game. It has not been *directly* established.

    About George Bush: I started the first grade with George and went to school with him for five years, so I know him better than most people. It is true that he could not have been the mastermind, but this does not imply that it was not an inside job.

    If 9/11 had been a conspiracy, somebody, sooner or later, would have come forward with evidence.

    Sooner or later somebody will come forward. The purpose of the Untouchables project is to make that happen.

    http://www.geniebusters.org/untouchables.html

    After saying all this, however, I must also say that I agree with your general thesis in this article. When you look at National Socialism and Islam from a distance, so the details fade out and only the general form remains, they are very similar.

    • Posted September 11, 2011 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

      @ “The evidence is abundant and overwhelming.”

      All of that “evidence” has been refuted. If you place links I can do the same, right?

      Top five 9/11 conspiracy theories debunked (here and here). Recent interview with editor of Popular Mechanics (here).

  6. Posted September 11, 2011 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    @ “…from, Debunking 9/11 Debunking, by David Ray Griffin”

    There’s a book published last month that debunks David Ray Griffin: the revised and expanded edition of Debunking 9/11 Conspiracy Theories (which includes rebuttals on claims about Building 7) by David Dunbar and Brad Reagan, with a foreword by James Meigs.

    If you already listened to the attorney of these crackpot theories, the logical step now is to listen to the prosecutor. It’s not logical—as every single WN truther I’ve met in the net do—to listen the “attorney” and, as a member of the “jury”, leave the room every time the prosecutor talks in order to avoid cognitive dissonance.

  7. Posted September 11, 2011 at 5:38 am | Permalink

    Sorry, I can’t resist:

    “it would be impossible for such a large-scale conspiracy to remain a secret for very long.”

    Um, ever hear of the Manhattan Project?

    “In any case, the assumption that ‘someone would have talked,’ being simply an assumption, cannot provide a rational basis for refusing to look directly at the evidence.” (From, Debunking 9/11 Debunking, by David Ray Griffin, pg.s 20 – 21, Olive Branch Press, 2007.)

  8. Posted September 11, 2011 at 5:33 am | Permalink

    “Sorry, Chechar, but I would sooner take authorities like Guenon, Schuon and Evola as authorities on Islam over non-Muslims with an agenda.”

    Or, more directly on point, the excellent scholars collected in Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition, Revised and Expanded: Essays by Western Muslim Scholars [World Wisdom, 2nd ed. 2009]

    • Jaego Scorzne
      Posted September 11, 2011 at 5:06 pm | Permalink

      I read a few of those essays – the special pleading was incredible. Like the one where it attempted to justify Jihad because the Muslims had invited Christains and Jews to join in because they needed troops. I also love Sufism and the Neo Traditionalists. But the attempt to explain Jihad as defence falls woefully short. And thus it cannot be squared with Sufism – or at least any kind of Sufism that Westerners could embrace without spitting on their own roots. It’s like saying Christ would be comfortable with all the methods that were used to spread Christianity. Mohammad would be comfortable with Jihad since he started it. A years or two before he died, he lead the first foray out of Arabia to the borders of Byzantium.

      The main figures of the Neo Traditionalist school died before the Modern Jihad began. Lings lived to see the London Bombing and spoke out against it to his credit, but I never heard that he explored the roots of the problem very closely. He felt like all of them that the End of the Age was near and that that would solve the Problem. Till then, He believed the established borders of the varioius religions would remain roughly the same. He thought that the Koran spoke positively of this diversity as the Will of Allah. So the question becomes: Did Mohammad understand completely the Revelation He was given? To my mind, that is the only way to square Islam as a Revelation and the horrible behavoir of Muslims. Of course that doesn’t explain the many terrible things Allah says in the Koran….unless Mohammad was getting some of it from his own mind. I mean it would really be best is Sufism could be separated from Islam completely – which I know is impossible.

      Anyway I give Lings some credit for trying a bit. The Iranian fellow whose name I forget just speaks in vague generalities about diversity in Islam and how Westerners must look at Sufism and not the dominant Wahabbis.

      • Fourmyle of Ceres
        Posted September 11, 2011 at 10:01 pm | Permalink

        Jaego Scorzne in blockquote:

        Of course that doesn’t explain the many terrible things Allah says in the Koran….unless Mohammad was getting some of it from his own mind. I mean it would really be best is Sufism could be separated from Islam completely – which I know is impossible.

        Anyway I give Lings some credit for trying a bit. The Iranian fellow whose name I forget just speaks in vague generalities about diversity in Islam and how Westerners must look at Sufism and not the dominant Wahabbis.

        Having argued years ago for the kinder, gentler Islamic community to develop a counterpart to Qom as a theological center, I would make one observation:

        Just as Jesus Christ of the Year Zero would not recognize or accept so much of what “Christianity” has adopted, adapted, and developed into over the years, so might the Next Islam attract people from Islam who wish to join the modern world.

        While Sufism is one aspect of Islam, I wonder if the Ba’hai Faith could serve as a bridge between what Islam was, and what it could be. Note that Sufism, if memory serves, has strong representation among the people of the Caucusus. From my limited understanding, Sufism, in practice, has a great deal in common with the Ba’hai Faith, in practice.

        What’s In YOUR Future? Focus Northwest!

  9. Jaego Scorzne
    Posted September 10, 2011 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

    Islamism? Really? By what right have we created a new word for a an old phenomena, namely jihad – an integral aspect of Islam. With this magic word the Neo Cons can fight Islam and allow a continuation of the huge Muslim immigration into the West. It’s bullshit. If we’re in a stuggle of Civilizations – and we are – we are dooming ourselves to defeat with this policy. The Neo Cons want to simultaneously defeat Islam and destroy the West. I don’t think it will work but their policy can and is destroying us. And everytime someone uses this bullshit magic word, they are helping them do it.

  10. Posted September 10, 2011 at 8:41 am | Permalink

    @ “I do recognize the validity of Islam as a manifestation of the ultimate metaphysical reality…”

    I agree with much of what you say above but… not with this! White nationalists are usually clueless about Islam. I know: because I came to WN thru counter-jihadism. As a commenter put it in my blog in one of my articles about 9/11:

    Well, the problem is that the counter-Jihad movement is often embarassingly pro-Jewish, and the WNs are often embarassingly pro-Muslim. They think accordingly to the axiom “The enemy of my enemy is my friend”, which is flawed in relation to logic, common-sense and reality of the world. The former try to rationalize every wrongdoing of the Jews, while the latter do their best to absolve the Muslims of any wrongdoing. And it’s somehow funny that counter-Jihadists are right about the Muslim threat, while WNs are right about the Jews as a toxic element in a Gentile society. Yet the axiom “The enemy of my enemy…” blinds them. It will be one of the most difficult tasks of a pro-White movement to bring these two camps together (of course, excluding both Jews and Muslims – even atheist Muslims – from such a debate, because they will promote their own agenda). I don’t know why it’s so difficult to grasp that Muslims are guilty for 9/11, and at the same time Jewish influence on our societies should be completely annihilated.

    Islam may inspire nationalist freedom fighters, especially those who want to grow a pair, yes: but this 7th century theocratic system has been our ancient enemy ever since a couple of centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire. You say that people should read diverse sources on the subject. I’d recommend Serge Trifkovic’s Sword of the Prophet, a book about the history and tenets of Islam as one of the greatest dangers to Western values since the end of the Cold War.

    Unlike Guilleme Faye, Trifkovic is conscious of the Jewish Question. Because of that he has been scolded by some clueless scholars in counter-jihadism.

    Trifkovic strikes me as one of our best intellectuals to understand Islam. See e.g., this video interview of Trifkovic made by a known racialist filmmaker.

    • Posted September 10, 2011 at 10:08 pm | Permalink

      Sorry, Chechar, but I would sooner take authorities like Guenon, Schuon and Evola as authorities on Islam over non-Muslims with an agenda.

      • Posted September 11, 2011 at 9:48 am | Permalink

        What bothers me the most among scholarly books on Islam like that enormous volume by Hans Küng, who wrote a monumental (and quite stupid) trilogy on the Abrahamic religions, Christianity, Judaism and lastly Islam, is that he says absolutely nothing about the nefarious influence of Jews and Muslims on the West; and as a Catholic theologian he obviously says nothing of how Christianity’s universalism lays at the very root of today’s malaise, as Greg Johnson states.

        Beware of these scholastic treatises! Any simple book by Prometheus Books that debunks religion (including Islam) has more value than that intellectual charlatanry for the sophisticated. (Tell me: who used to be a Küng fan when I was a believer.)

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  • […] 2] Nepříliš známý, ale z naší perspektivy obzvláště zajímavý, je súfista šejk Ian Dallas, také známý jako Abdalqadir as-Sufí, který svůj Řád dnes řídí z Jižní Afriky. Skot Dallas, který psával scénáře pro BBC a přátelil se s lidmi jako Federico Fellini (střihl si epizodní roli kouzelníka v 8½), Edith Piaf, R. D. Laing, Eric Clapton (kterému dal výtisk perské súfijské bajky Layla a Majnún, na jejímž základě pak Clapton složil stejnojmennou píseň), George Harrison, a Bob Dylan (který jej v roce 1967 označil za jediného „zajímavého člověka v Anglii“) konvertoval k súfismu během cesty do Maroka v roce 1967 a během následujících desetiletí napsal mnoho knih a esejí, sjednocujících myšlenky a témata otevřeně převzaté jak od představitelů konzervativní revoluce kalibru Ernsta Jüngera (pro něhož v 80. letech zorganizoval sympozium) a Carla Schmitta, tak od Friedricha Nietzscheho, Richarda Wagnera a nacionálních socialistů. Také se pokusil zformulovat jedinečnou formu politického islámu, která měla jen málo společného s běžně chápaným politickým islámem a která spojuje četné prvky evropské tradice. Dokonce propaguje pro islámský svět nový ekonomický systém založený na zlatém islámské denáru. Jeho web naleznete zde: http://www.shaykhabdalqadir.com. […]

  • […] within the movement. Below I cite two of my recent comments of my previous entry, and another at Counter-Currents: I am not a believer of the “official version”. I am a skeptic of extreme claims that violate […]

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