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Who are the Sikhs?

743 words

Guru Nanak surrounded by his nine successor gurus

In light of the Sikh temple massacre in Wisconsin, I wish to extend my condolences to the Sikh community as they deal with this tragedy. Although Sikhs do not belong in America, there are plenty of reasons why American White Nationalists might wish to admire them from afar.

When the Muslims invaded the Indian subcontinent, bringing with them a counterfeit religion and a totalitarian social structure that is abhorrent to any spiritually awakened Aryan, the Kshatriyas of the region failed to defend their society. Many of those decadent Kshatriya communities were formally degraded and their progeny are now swarthy beggars and petty thieves, the gypsies that pollute Europe’s cities.

The civilization brought to the subcontinent centuries (perhaps millennia) before by the Aryans and sustained by their descendents in the high castes was slowly being destroyed.

It was at this time that Guru Nanak  founded a religious movement that fought superstition and avoided the elaborate rituals, idol worship, and asceticism that marked much of Hindu practice at the time. He preached of a God that resembled that of America’s Deist founders. His followers focused on meditation, cleanliness, and straight-dealing. Though officially they do not recognize caste, they drew mainly from the higher castes.

Sikhs began to intermarry and set up a counter culture. By the time of the fifth Guru, they had become well-established in economic niches (like horse trading) and started building what is now their fortress Temple of Amritsar. When their fifth Guru was tortured to death by the Mughal Emperor Jahangir, the sixth Guru created a secret military order and eventually took the battle to the Mughals. This Guru also encouraged hunting and martial arts as hobbies.

First Emperor Maharaja Ranjit Singh

The Sikh community continued to grow as it attracted converts from those Hindus who were man enough to become Priest-Warriors. Within 300 years of their founding they established an Empire in which they ruled over a 70% Muslim population. They also protected the religious liberty of the 13% Hindu population, though they have always disdained the medieval innovation of idol worship. They outlawed veils and widow-burning. Had the English not come, the momentum was in the Sikhs’ favor to eventually cast off all Muslim overlords in the subcontinent.

Now the Sikhs are known for the 5 Ks that they must always have with them (some of which are visible): uncut hair, a comb, daggers, a steel bracelet, and underwear that is not conducive to rape. Because adult men wrap their hair under a turban, they are sometimes mistaken for Muslims. Rather ironic, when one considers their history. In fact, the vast majority of turban wearers in the West are Sikhs.

All of the men have the last name Singh, meaning lion, to obscure their caste origin and focus on their warrior nature. All women adopt the last name of Kaur, meaning Lioness.

After the 10th Guru, a book of the 10 Gurus’ sayings was compiled to become their 11thand Final Guru, the Guru Granth Sahib. It is the center of their worship. They bow to the Guru Granth Sahib in the Temple and recite the entire book as a “Sacrifice” in place of traditional Vedic sacrifices. Despite its monotheistic character, reverence for the written word, and lack of idol worship, the Sikh religion is a “reformed” version of Hinduism and has nothing to do with Islam. The Guru Granth Sahib is more comparable to the Book of Ecclesiastes or the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius.

In my own life, I have known about a half dozen Sikhs and none of them were liars or hypocrites. They are over-represented in India’s military and among their Olympic competitors. They are also known for military service and entrepreneurship in the countries where they settle. In the UK, Sikh community leaders have been important in helping to legitimize the BNP as a political party. It is safe to say that they will be an eager ally whenever Europeans decide that we are sick of living with Muslims. Sikhs with swords still terrify Muslims. Even this Muslim talent show host can’t hide his fear.

That being said, I wish to reiterate my condolences to the Sikh Community. And to my White Nationalist comrades, I hope we can learn from their example. They have demonstrated how in a multi-racial society under invasion it is possible to stand up and be “men among the ruins.”

 

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12 Comments

  1. Posted August 18, 2012 at 7:34 am | Permalink

    I differ with most people here; I found this blog post I couldn’t stop until I finished, even though it wasn’t just what I had been searching for, was still a nice read though. I will instantly get your blog feed to stay in touch of any updates.

  2. Posted August 9, 2012 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

    Very helpful information. I’ve commented on it and linked to it here:
    http://ex-army.blogspot.com/2012/08/okay-then-what-are-sikhs-anyway.html

  3. Lew
    Posted August 8, 2012 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    This article was a gem. I’m don’t think I’ve ever learned so much from 700 words in my life.

  4. Jacques Vendée
    Posted August 8, 2012 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    I think articles like this are very important. I realize that the purpose of CC is to discuss the NANR and WN but the occassional incorporation of other nationalisms into the discussion would be very illuminating and most welcome–if for no other reason that to remind us that we are not the only ones fighting for the survival of our race and traditions. The Indian sub-continent alone is a rich and fascinating study in various types of nationalism.

    • Jaego Scorzne
      Posted August 8, 2012 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

      I believe the Sons of Shiva told the Sikh Nationalists in the Punjab that they would trade them life for life.

  5. Gladiator
    Posted August 8, 2012 at 7:57 am | Permalink

    I don’t like that 5 k about the underwear, pal.

  6. Kerry Bolton
    Posted August 8, 2012 at 12:00 am | Permalink

    Here, here! Great article.

  7. Dominion
    Posted August 7, 2012 at 9:58 pm | Permalink

    The story about how the tenth Guru Gobind Singh founded the Khalsa, the initiated Sikh community, is inspiring indeed:

    Having gathered at a harvest festival, the Guru asked for a volunteer willing to sacrifice his own head for the faith. No one answered to begin with, but finally one man came up. He was lead into the tent, and then the Guru came out alone with blood on his sword. This was repeated four more times, and each time the Guru would come out with blood on his sword. After this was finished, the Guru put down his sword and revealed the men, living and dressed in new clothing. The Guru then gave these men a special nectar mixed with a sword, and they were the first given the name Singh (lion). These five were called the Five Beloved Ones. The Guru then asked them in turn to initiate him, and thus the Khalsa was born.

  8. Faustus
    Posted August 7, 2012 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    Excellent.

    We would be very fortunate, indeed, if a spokesman for this community would engage those regulars here, and see what some of their thoughts are about America, our interactions, and what they see or fear in the future.

  9. Markus
    Posted August 7, 2012 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

    Very informative and highly appreciated article.

    By the way, are there any people from Indian subcontinent who you would consider “Aryan” or “Indo-European” to say they “belong in America”? “United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind” was an interesting case.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Bhagat_Singh_Thind

    • NM
      Posted August 8, 2012 at 8:46 am | Permalink

      By the way, are there any people from Indian subcontinent who you would consider “Aryan” or “Indo-European” to say they “belong in America”?

      I can’t answer for Patrick Le Brun, but my answer would be “none of them”.

      They’re simply too culturally and racially alien, end of story. In a distant age their Brahmin upper castes were more like us, but they have polluted their once-pristine Eastern European bloodlines long ago. Nowadays, almost all of them have Australoid features and look non-white.

      I suppose the Sikhs or the Parsis (Zoroastrians) would be your safest bet if you wanted to find semi-preserved “Aryans” still in South Asia.

  10. Gregory Hood
    Posted August 7, 2012 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

    An excellent and important piece.

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