Tag Archives: commemorations

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Remembering Carl Schmitt:
July 11, 1888–April 7, 1985

Carl Schmitt, 1888–1985

988 words

Carl Schmitt was born on July 11, 1888 in Plettenberg, Westphalia, Germany — where he died on April 7, 1985, at the age of 96. The son of a Roman Catholic small businessman, Carl Schmitt studied law in Berlin, Munich, and Strasbourg, graduating and taking his state exams in Strasbourg in 1915. In 1916, he earned his habilitation in Strasbourg, qualifying him to be a law professor. He taught at business schools and universities in Munich, Greifswald, Bonn, Berlin, and Cologne.

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Remembering Revilo Oliver (July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994)
Revilo Oliver in Winter

1,992 words

Today is the birthday of Revilo Pendleton Oliver, born in Texas in 1908. He was Professor of Classics and Modern Languages at the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana) for many years, an analyst with the War Department in the 1940s, and a contributor to the National Review and other publications from the 1950s onward.

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Remembering Revilo Oliver (July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994)
The Professor & the Carnival Barker

3,431 words

Professor Revilo Pendleton Oliver died in 1994, full of years and honors, as they say; and also notoriety. Long a Classics professor at the University of Illinois in Urbana, he gained his PhD in 1938 with a translation and commentary on a 1500-year-old Sanskrit drama. At age 80 was capable of holding lengthy telephone conversions with a young fellow linguist, in which (just to show off) they would switch back and forth between German and Attic Greek.

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Remembering Revilo Oliver:
July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994

350 words

Revilo Pendleton Oliver was born in Texas on this day in 1908. He received his undergraduate degree at Pomona College in California and his doctorate in classics at the University of Illinois under William Abbot Oldfather. He was Professor of Classics at the University of Illinois for many years. Read more …

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Remembering Oswald Spengler:
May 29, 1880–May 8, 1936

553 words

Oswald Spengler was born on this day in 1880. For his contributions to the philosophy of history and culture, Spengler is one of the most important philosophical influences on the North American New Right, largely by way of his disciple Francis Parker Yockey. Spengler is often wrong, but even when he errs, he does so magnificently.

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Remembering Louis-Ferdinand Céline:
May 27, 1894–July 1, 1961

198 words

Louis-Ferdinand Céline was the pen name of French novelist, essayist, and physician Louis-Ferdinand-Auguste Destouches, who was born on this day in 1894. Céline is one of the giants of 20th-century literature. And, like Ezra Pound and so many other great writers of the last century, he was an open and unapologetic racial nationalist. For more on Céline, see the following works on this website: Read more …

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Remembering Richard Wagner:
May 22, 1813–February 13, 1883

444 words

Richard Wagner was born 206 years ago today in Leipzig in the Kingdom of Saxony. He died on February 13, 1883 in Venice. As an artist, intellectual, author, and cultural force, Wagner has left an immense metapolitical legacy, which is being evaluated and appropriated in the North American New Right. I wish to draw your attention to the following writings which have been published at Counter-Currents/North American New RightRead more …

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Remembering Dominique Venner:
April 16, 1935–May 21, 2013

527 words

The French soldier, historian, and European patriot Dominique Venner was born on this day in 1935. He famously ended his life with a bullet on the altar of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris on May 21, 2013 to protest the demographic replacement of Europeans. Through both his life’s work and his death, Venner wished to draw attention to the demographic decline of European man and to indicate what we must be prepared to give to save our people: everything. But his death will be in vain unless it is remembered. So take this day to remember Dominique Venner: his life, his work, and his sacrifice.

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Remembering Jonathan Bowden:
April 12, 1962–March 29, 2012

938 words

Jonathan David Anthony Bowden was born on April 12, 1962. He died on March 29, 2012, just short of his 50th birthday. Jonathan was a painter, novelist, essayist, playwright, actor, and orator. He was also a friend. His ideas and personality have had a real and permanent impact on my approach to New Right metapolitics. He will be missed, but he will also be remembered and honored. Read more …

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Robert Brasillach & Notre avant-guerre:
Remembering Robert Brasillach, March 31, 1909–February 6, 1945

Robert Brasillach at his trial in 1945.

3,574 words

Today is the birthday of Robert Brasillach, French journalist, novelist, and film historian (The History of Motion Pictures, co-written with Maurice Bardéche).

It is Brasillach’s fate mainly to be remembered for being the only collaborateur sentenced to death (by firing squad) for “intellectual crimes.”  Read more …

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The Man of the Twentieth Century:
Remembering Ernst Jünger,
March 29, 1895–February 17, 1998

3,553 words

Hungarian translation here; Czech translation here


Audio version: To listen in a player, use the one above or click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.” To subscribe to the CC podcast RSS feed, click here.

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Remembering Ernst Jünger:
March 29, 1895–February 17, 1998

405 words

Ernst Jünger was born on this day in 1895.

In commemoration, we wish to draw your attention to the following works published on this site.

First, there are three pieces by Jünger himself:

Read more …

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The Power of Myth:
Remembering Joseph Campbell,
March 26, 1904–October 30, 1987

Joseph Campbell & his wife, Jean Erdman Campbell, c. 1939.

2,318 words

Joseph Campbell, the famed teacher of comparative mythology, was born on this day in 1904. For many people, including yours truly, he has served as a “gateway drug” into not only a new way of looking at myths, but into a non-materialistic way of viewing the world. And although as a public figure, Campbell mostly remained apolitical, evidence from his private life indicates that he was at least nominally a “man of the Right.” Read more …

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Remembering Gabriele D’Annunzio:
March 12, 1863–March 1, 1938

137 words

Today is the birthday of Gabriele D’Annunzio, novelist, poet, playwright, aesthete, dandy, playboy, war hero, and the first fascist dictator, who from 1919 to 1920 ruled over the Adriatic city-state of Fiume, establishing many of the political and aesthetic forms followed by Mussolini a few years later.

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Remembering Guillaume Faye:
November 7, 1949–March 7, 2019

1,241 words

I was deeply saddened to learn today of the death of French New Right philosopher and polemicist Guillaume Faye after a battle with cancer. Faye had been sick for some time, but he was so focused on writing what will now be his last book that he postponed seeing a doctor until it was complete. When he finally sought medical attention, he was diagnosed with stage four cancer. There is no stage five. Guillaume Faye gave his life for his work, and his work for Europe. Read more …

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Remembering A. R. D. “Rex” Fairburn:
February 2, 1904–March 25, 1957

97 words

Today is the birthday of New Zealand poet, essayist, Social Credit advocate, and social reformer Arthur Rex Dugard Fairburn, another Artist of the Right. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site.

By Fairburn: Read more …

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Remembering Yukio Mishima:
January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970

685 words

Spanish translation here

Yukio Mishima was one of the giants of 20th-century Japanese literature. Read more …

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Remembering Jack London:
January 12, 1876–November 22, 1916

467 words

Spanish version here

Jack London was born John Griffith Chaney in San Francisco on January 12, 1876. An adventurer and Jack of all trades in his youth, London achieved fame and fortune as a fiction writer and journalist. But he never forgot his working class roots and remained a life-long advocate of workers’ rights, unionism, and revolutionary socialism. (See his essay “What Life Means to Me.”)

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Remembering Robinson Jeffers:
January 10, 1887–January 20, 1962

274 words

Robinson Jeffers was born on January 10, 1887.

Once regarded as one of the greatest American poets, Jeffers is largely forgotten by the literary establishment today, no doubt because of his politically incorrect subjects and views. A Nietzschean who was accused of fascist sympathies (which he denied), he celebrated nature and the outdoors in his work, eschewing the abstruse modernist style that was fashionable in his day. Read more …

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Remembering Anthony M. Ludovici:
January 8, 1882–April 3, 1971

458 words

Anthony Mario Ludovici was born on January 8, 1882.

Ludovici was one of the first and most accomplished translators of Nietzsche into English and a leading exponent of Nietzsche’s thought. Ludovici was also an original philosopher in his own right. Read more …

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Remembering Alan Watts:
January 6, 1915–November 16, 1973

159 words

Alan Watts was born on this day in 1915. A prolific scholar and dazzling stylist, Watts is best known as the chief popularizer of Asian philosophy for the Beat and Hippy movements, but he was also an original thinker in his own right and a quiet man of the Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to these works at Counter-Currents: Read more …

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Remembering J. R. R. Tolkien:
January 3, 1892–September 2, 1973

471 words

“I am in fact a Hobbit.”—J. R. R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien is a favorite author of New Left “hippies” and New Right nationalists, and for pretty much the same reasons. Tolkien deeply distrusted modernization and industrialization, which replace organic reciprocity between man and nature with technological dominion of man over nature, a relationship that deforms and devalues both poles. Read more …

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Remembering Pierre Drieu La Rochelle:
January 3, 1893–March 15, 1945

97 words

Pierre Drieu La Rochelle was born on this day in 1893. In commemoration, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site: Read more …

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Remembering Rudyard Kipling:
December 30, 1865 to January 18, 1936

3,063 words

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

Nobel Prize-winning poet and novelist Rudyard Kipling was born on this day in 1865. For an introduction to his life and works, see the following articles on this site.

Read more …

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Remembering Filippo Marinetti:
December 22, 1876–December 2, 1944

Marinetti in the First World War.

173 words

Those on the Right who believe that modern art is always “decadent” need to come to grips with Italian Futurism. In commemoration of the birthday of Filippo Marinetti, the founder of Italian Futurism and one of the prophets of Fascism, I would like to draw your attention to several writings on this Website.

1. Marinetti’s own “Futurist Manifesto” of 1909.

2. Kerry Bolton’s essay “Filippo Marinetti,” which has also been published in his book Artists of the Right: Resisting Decadence. (Portuguese translation here.)

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Honoring Pentti Linkola

150 words

Finnish “eco-fascist” Pentti Linkola turns 86 today. Along with Savitri Devi, Linkola is one of the few figures in the post-War ecological movement to take openly Right-wing positions, rejecting liberal egalitarianism and democracy and advocating eugenics.

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Remembering P. R. Stephensen:
November 20, 1901–May 28, 1965

P. R. Stephensen, circa 1934

237 words

Percy Reginald Stephensen was born on November 20, 1901. Stephensen was a writer, publisher, and political activist dedicated to the interests of the white race and the Australian nation. Like Jack London, Stephensen was an archetypal man of the racially conscious Left. He began his political career as a Communist but later moved to the nationalistic, anti-Semitic Right. From 1942 to 1945, he was interned without trial for his pro-German and pro-Japanese sympathies.

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Remembering Madison Grant:
November 19, 1865–May 30, 1937

84 words

Today is the birthday of Madison Grant, American aristocrat and pioneering advocate of white racial preservationism, immigration restriction, eugenics, anti-miscegenation laws, and the conservation of wildlife and wilderness. To learn more about Grant’s life and legacy, see these articles at Counter-Currents: Read more …

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Remembering Wyndham Lewis:
November 18, 1882–March 7, 1957

165 words

Wyndham Lewis was born on this day in 1882. A first-rate novelist, critic, and painter, he was a leading English exponent of fascist modernism. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website:

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Remembering Sir Oswald Mosley:
November 16, 1896–December 3, 1980

868 words

Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet of Ancoats, was an English aristocrat (a fourth cousin once removed of Queen Elizabeth II) and statesman. Mosley was a Member of Parliament for Harrow from 1918 to 1924 and for Smethwick from 1926 to 1931. He was also Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster in the Labour Government of 1929–1931.

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