Tag Archives: commemorations

Print this post Print this post

Remembering Guillaume Faye:
November 7, 1949–March 7, 2019

1,217 words

Today is Guillaume Faye’s first birthday since his death earlier this year after a battle with cancer. Faye had been sick for some time, but he was so focused on writing what will now be his last book that he postponed seeing a doctor until it was complete. When he finally sought medical attention, he was diagnosed with stage four cancer. There is no stage five. Guillaume Faye gave his life for his work, and his work for Europe.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

For Leo Yankevich:
October 30, 1961 to December 11, 2018

Leo Yankevich, March 22, 2016

430 words

A Glosa[1]

Four lines from an abandoned poem:
Come the time, a season of chaste snow,
And over meadows, birds will greet the dawn,
And you will see where the dead have gone,
There where the sun has shed its final glow. — Leo Yankevich

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Video of the Day 
An Amateur History of Halloween

15 words / 10:40

Hugh MacDonald discusses the history of the Halloween tradition as an element of European identity. Read more …

Posted in video of the day | Also tagged , , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Friedrich Nietzsche:
October 15, 1844–August 25, 1900

717 words

Friedrich Nietzsche was born this day in 1844 in the small town of Röcken, near Leipzig, Saxony, in the Kingdom of Prussia. He died in August 25, 1900, in Weimar, Saxony, in the Second German Reich. The outlines of Nietzsche’s life are readily available online.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 4 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Aleister Crowley:
October 12, 1875–December 1, 1947

Aleister Crowley by Charles Krafft

382 words

Aleister Crowley was an English poet, novelist, painter, and mountaineer who is most famous as an occultist, ceremonial magician, and founder of the religion and philosophy of Thelema. But ironically Crowley’s supposed Satanism and Black Magic are far less frightening to most people than his politics. For Aleister Crowley was also a man of the Right.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Roy Campbell:
October 2, 1901–April 22, 1957

Roy Campbell

1,561 words

Roy Campbell was a South African poet and essayist. T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, and Edith Sitwell praised Campbell as one of the best poets of the inter-war period. Unfortunately, his conservatism, Nietzscheanism, and Catholicism, as well as his open contempt for the Bloomsbury set and his participation in the Spanish Civil War on the Fascist side, have led his works to be consigned to the memory hole. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Louis de Bonald:
October 2, 1754–November 23, 1840

Louis de Bonald

137 words

Louis Gabriel Ambroise, Vicomte de Bonald, is one of the great French counter-Revolutionary conservative thinkers. For an overview of his life, see “Louis Gabriel Ambroise, Vicomte de Bonald,” here at Counter-Currents.

F. Roger Devlin has written several pieces assessing Bonald’s contribution to the North American New Right: Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Maurice Bardèche:
October 1, 1907–July 30, 1998

643 words

Today is the birthday of Maurice Bardèche (1907–1998), the French Neo-Fascist writer. Bardèche was a prolific and highly versatile author of literary, film, and art criticism, history, journalism, and social and political theory. He published twenty-odd books and countless essays, articles, and reviews. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Martin Heidegger:
September 26, 1889–May 26, 1976

1,855 words

Translations: RussianSlovak, SpanishUkrainian

Martin Heidegger is one of the giants of twentieth-century philosophy, both in terms of the depth and originality of his ideas and the breadth of his influence in philosophy, theology, the human sciences, and culture in general.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 10 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering T. S. Eliot:
September 26, 1888–January 4, 1965

231 words

Thomas Stearns Eliot was one of the 20th century’s most influential poets, as well as an essayist, literary critic, playwright, and publisher. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1948. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, from old New England stock, Eliot emigrated to England in 1914 and was naturalized as a British subject in 1927.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Francis Parker Yockey:
September 18, 1917–June 16, 1960

406 words

Francis Parker Yockey was born 102 years ago today, September 18, in Chicago. He died in San Francisco on June 16, 1960, an apparent suicide. Yockey is one of America’s greatest anti-liberal thinkers and an abiding influence on the North American New Right. In honor of his birthday, I wish to draw the reader’s attention to the following works on this site.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering D. H. Lawrence:
September 11, 1885–March 2, 1930

409 words

David Herbert Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885 in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England and died from tuberculosis on March 2, 1930 in Vence, France, at the age of 44.

The fourth son of a nearly-illiterate coal miner, Lawrence rose by dint of genius and hard work to become an internationally famous, often censored, and sometimes persecuted novelist, poet, essayist, and painter.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

Leni Riefenstahl in Modern Memory

2,147 words

One of the delights of revisiting old movies after many years is finding out that you completely misread or misremembered certain scenes. Early on in the first part of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, we have the entry parades of the national teams. When the French team come by, they drag their flag in the dust – because, or so I assumed decades ago, these robust athletes were utterly disgusted with the new Popular Front government under the hapless Léon Blum Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 11 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Leni Riefenstahl:
August 22, 1902–September 8, 2003

782 words

German translation here

Helene Bertha Amalie “Leni” Riefenstahl was born on this day in Berlin in 1902. She died in Pöcking, Bavaria, on September 8, 2003, just after her 101st birthday. She was a highly accomplished dancer, actress, photographer, and film director. 

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering H. P. Lovecraft:
August 20, 1890–March 15, 1937

858 words

Howard Phillips Lovecraft was born on August 20, 1890, in Providence, Rhode Island, and died there of cancer on March 15, 1937. An heir to Poe and Hawthorne, Lovecraft is one of the pioneers of modern science fiction, fantasy, and horror literature. Lovecraft is a literary favorite in New Rightist circles, for reasons that will become clear from a perusal of the following works on this website.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 6 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Defaming Unity Mitford

1,699 words

Unity Valkyrie Mitford was born on August 8, 1914 and died of the aftereffects of a head wound on May 28, 1948. One of six sisters from a landed, aristocratic English family, she became fascinated by the National Socialist movement in Germany while still in her teens. At 20, in Munich, she met Adolf Hitler. At 25, she was plunged into such despair by the outbreak of war between England and Germany that she shot herself with a pistol, in a Munich park. She returned to England, via neutral Switzerland, on a stretcher.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Unity Valkyrie Mitford:
August 8, 1914–May 28, 1948

Unity_Mitford642 words

Unity Valkyrie Mitford was born on this day in 1914. Unity was easily the most notorious of the Mitford girls, the six daughters of David Freeman-Mitford, 2nd Baron Redesdale and his wife Sydney (née Bowles).

Diana Mitford became the wife of Sir Oswald Mosley. Unity became Hitler’s confidante. Jessica became a Communist journalist. Nancy became a novelist and biographer. Deborah, who is still alive at 94, became the Duchess of Devonshire. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Knut Hamsun:
August 4, 1859–February 19, 1952

421 words

Knut Hamsun was born Knut Pedersen in Lom, Norway on August 4, 1859. He died in Grimstad, Norway, on February 19, 1952. The author of more than twenty novels, plus poems, short stories, plays, and essays, Hamsun was one of the twentieth century’s most influential writers. His rejection of both Romanticism and naturalism, his emphasis on outsiders and rebels, and his exploration of inner and sometimes extreme states of consciousness, made him a pioneer of literary modernism. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Willis Carto:
July 17, 1926–October 26, 2015

carto19601,980 words

If you know the broad outlines of Willis Allison Carto’s life (biography review here), you know that he was, for well over a half-century, the founder and patron of those political movements we now variously call paleoconservatism, race realism, Dissident Right, or White Nationalism.

Pause and consider. When you imbibe the heady sophistication and philosophical analyses here at Counter-CurrentsRead more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Carl Schmitt:
July 11, 1888–April 7, 1985

Carl Schmitt, 1888–1985

988 words

Carl Schmitt was born on July 11, 1888 in Plettenberg, Westphalia, Germany — where he died on April 7, 1985, at the age of 96. The son of a Roman Catholic small businessman, Carl Schmitt studied law in Berlin, Munich, and Strasbourg, graduating and taking his state exams in Strasbourg in 1915. In 1916, he earned his habilitation in Strasbourg, qualifying him to be a law professor. He taught at business schools and universities in Munich, Greifswald, Bonn, Berlin, and Cologne.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | 4 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Revilo Oliver (July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994)
Revilo Oliver in Winter

1,992 words

Today is the birthday of Revilo Pendleton Oliver, born in Texas in 1908. He was Professor of Classics and Modern Languages at the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana) for many years, an analyst with the War Department in the 1940s, and a contributor to the National Review and other publications from the 1950s onward.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Revilo Oliver (July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994)
The Professor & the Carnival Barker

3,431 words

Professor Revilo Pendleton Oliver died in 1994, full of years and honors, as they say; and also notoriety. Long a Classics professor at the University of Illinois in Urbana, he gained his PhD in 1938 with a translation and commentary on a 1500-year-old Sanskrit drama. At age 80 was capable of holding lengthy telephone conversions with a young fellow linguist, in which (just to show off) they would switch back and forth between German and Attic Greek.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Revilo Oliver:
July 7, 1908–August 20, 1994

350 words

Revilo Pendleton Oliver was born in Texas on this day in 1908. He received his undergraduate degree at Pomona College in California and his doctorate in classics at the University of Illinois under William Abbot Oldfather. He was Professor of Classics at the University of Illinois for many years. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Oswald Spengler:
May 29, 1880–May 8, 1936

553 words

Oswald Spengler was born on this day in 1880. For his contributions to the philosophy of history and culture, Spengler is one of the most important philosophical influences on the North American New Right, largely by way of his disciple Francis Parker Yockey. Spengler is often wrong, but even when he errs, he does so magnificently.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Louis-Ferdinand Céline:
May 27, 1894–July 1, 1961

198 words

Louis-Ferdinand Céline was the pen name of French novelist, essayist, and physician Louis-Ferdinand-Auguste Destouches, who was born on this day in 1894. Céline is one of the giants of 20th-century literature. And, like Ezra Pound and so many other great writers of the last century, he was an open and unapologetic racial nationalist. For more on Céline, see the following works on this website: Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Richard Wagner:
May 22, 1813–February 13, 1883

444 words

Richard Wagner was born 206 years ago today in Leipzig in the Kingdom of Saxony. He died on February 13, 1883 in Venice. As an artist, intellectual, author, and cultural force, Wagner has left an immense metapolitical legacy, which is being evaluated and appropriated in the North American New Right. I wish to draw your attention to the following writings which have been published at Counter-Currents/North American New RightRead more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 1 Response
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Dominique Venner:
April 16, 1935–May 21, 2013

527 words

The French soldier, historian, and European patriot Dominique Venner was born on this day in 1935. He famously ended his life with a bullet on the altar of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris on May 21, 2013 to protest the demographic replacement of Europeans. Through both his life’s work and his death, Venner wished to draw attention to the demographic decline of European man and to indicate what we must be prepared to give to save our people: everything. But his death will be in vain unless it is remembered. So take this day to remember Dominique Venner: his life, his work, and his sacrifice.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 3 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Remembering Jonathan Bowden:
April 12, 1962–March 29, 2012

938 words

Jonathan David Anthony Bowden was born on April 12, 1962. He died on March 29, 2012, just short of his 50th birthday. Jonathan was a painter, novelist, essayist, playwright, actor, and orator. He was also a friend. His ideas and personality have had a real and permanent impact on my approach to New Right metapolitics. He will be missed, but he will also be remembered and honored. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , | 2 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Robert Brasillach & Notre avant-guerre:
Remembering Robert Brasillach, March 31, 1909–February 6, 1945

Robert Brasillach at his trial in 1945.

3,574 words

Today is the birthday of Robert Brasillach, French journalist, novelist, and film historian (The History of Motion Pictures, co-written with Maurice Bardéche).

It is Brasillach’s fate mainly to be remembered for being the only collaborateur sentenced to death (by firing squad) for “intellectual crimes.”  Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Print this post Print this post

The Man of the Twentieth Century:
Remembering Ernst Jünger,
March 29, 1895–February 17, 1998

3,553 words

Hungarian translation here; Czech translation here


Audio version: To listen in a player, use the one above or click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.” To subscribe to the CC podcast RSS feed, click here.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Responses
  • Our Titles

    The White Nationalist Manifesto

    From Plato to Postmodernism

    The Gizmo

    Return of the Son of Trevor Lynch's CENSORED Guide to the Movies

    Toward a New Nationalism

    The Smut Book

    The Alternative Right

    My Nationalist Pony

    Dark Right: Batman Viewed From the Right

    The Philatelist

    Novel Folklore

    Confessions of an Anti-Feminist

    East and West

    Though We Be Dead, Yet Our Day Will Come

    White Like You

    The Homo and the Negro, Second Edition

    Numinous Machines

    The World in Flames

    Venus and Her Thugs

    Cynosura

    North American New Right, vol. 2

    You Asked For It

    More Artists of the Right

    Extremists: Studies in Metapolitics

    Rising

    The Importance of James Bond

    In Defense of Prejudice

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater (2nd ed.)

    The Hypocrisies of Heaven

    Waking Up from the American Dream

    Green Nazis in Space!

    Truth, Justice, and a Nice White Country

    Heidegger in Chicago

    The End of an Era

    Sexual Utopia in Power

    What is a Rune? & Other Essays

    Son of Trevor Lynch's White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    The Lightning & the Sun

    The Eldritch Evola

    Western Civilization Bites Back

    New Right vs. Old Right

    Lost Violent Souls

    Journey Late at Night: Poems and Translations

    The Non-Hindu Indians & Indian Unity

    Baader Meinhof ceramic pistol, Charles Kraaft 2013

    Jonathan Bowden as Dirty Harry

    The Lost Philosopher, Second Expanded Edition

    Trevor Lynch's A White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    And Time Rolls On

    The Homo & the Negro

    Artists of the Right

    North American New Right, Vol. 1

    Some Thoughts on Hitler

    Tikkun Olam and Other Poems

    Under the Nihil

    Summoning the Gods

    Hold Back This Day

    The Columbine Pilgrim

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater

    Taking Our Own Side

    Toward the White Republic

    Distributed Titles

    Reuben

    The Node

    A Sky Without Eagles

    The Way of Men

    The New Austerities

    Morning Crafts

    The Passing of a Profit & Other Forgotten Stories

    Asatru: A Native European Spirituality

    The Lost Philosopher

    Impeachment of Man

    Gold in the Furnace

    Defiance