Tag Archives: commemorations

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Remembering Oswald Spengler
(May 29, 1880–May 8, 1936)

580 words

Oswald Spengler was born on this day in 1880. For his contributions to the philosophy of history and culture, Spengler is one of the most important philosophical influences on the North American New Right, largely by way of his disciple Francis Parker Yockey. Spengler is often wrong, but even when he errs, he does so magnificently.

Read more …

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Remembering Louis-Ferdinand Céline
(May 27, 1894–July 1, 1961)

215 words

Louis-Ferdinand Céline was the pen name of French novelist, essayist, and physician Louis-Ferdinand-Auguste Destouches, who was born on this day in 1894. Céline is one of the giants of 20th-century literature. And, like Ezra Pound and so many other great writers of the last century, he was an open and unapologetic racial nationalist. For more on Céline, see the following works on this website: Read more …

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Remembering Richard Wagner
(May 22, 1813–February 13, 1883)

472 words

Richard Wagner was born 206 years ago today in Leipzig in the Kingdom of Saxony. He died on February 13, 1883 in Venice. As an artist, intellectual, author, and cultural force, Wagner has left an immense metapolitical legacy, which is being evaluated and appropriated in the North American New Right. I wish to draw your attention to the following writings which have been published at Counter-Currents. Read more …

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Remembering Julius Evola:
May 19, 1898–June 11, 1974

1,010 words

Baron Giulio Cesare Andrea Evola was born on May 19, 1898 in Rome. Along with René Guénon, Evola is one of the writers who has most influenced the metapolitical outlook and project of Counter-Currents, which is reflected in the fact that Evola is one of the most-tagged writers on this website. In commemoration of his birthday, I wish to draw your attention to the following resources.

Counter-Currents has published the following writings of Evola’s:  Read more …

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Remembering Thomas Nelson Page
(April 23, 1853 — November 1, 1922)

2,365 words

After the Civil War, the American South was in ruins. Beyond the poverty, oppression, and the rapid demise of the old regime, however, the inheritors of the former Confederacy found themselves without defense in the national court of moral opinion. They were a defeated people who had drawn arms against a tolerant and progressive government in order to cling to outmoded ways of life, including (most offensively to some) the ancient practice of slavery.

Those who pined for the South’s days of greatness needed a champion. During the postbellum period, Thomas Nelson Page was one such champion. Read more …

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Earth Day Special

393 words

Today is Earth Day, which has been an occasion to call for conservationism and environmental protection since it was first celebrated in America with bipartisan support in 1970, in response to the Santa Barbara oil spill of 1969. Although in recent decades, environmentalism has come to be identified with the political Left, taking stewardship of the Earth and seeking harmony in the relationship between man and nature has traditionally been an issue of the Right. Read more …

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Remembering Jonathan Bowden:
April 12, 1962–March 29, 2012

943 words

Jonathan David Anthony Bowden was born on April 12, 1962. He died on March 29, 2012, just short of his 50th birthday. Jonathan was a painter, novelist, essayist, playwright, actor, and orator. He was also a friend. His ideas and personality have had a real and permanent impact on my approach to New Right metapolitics. He will be missed, but he will also be remembered and honored. Read more …

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Bowden & I. . .

375 words

“You fight for your own country, and your own group, and your own culture, and your own civilization, at your own level, and in your own way. And when someone says apologize for this or for that, you say: No. I regret nothing!”

— Jonathan Bowden (Credo) Read more …

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Remembering Krzysztof Penderecki
(November 23, 1933 — March 29, 2020)

2,836 words

Krzysztof Penderecki, who died on March 29, 2020, was one of the most prolific and creative composers of the past century. His works include four operas, eight symphonies plus other orchestral works, about a dozen concertos, vocal and choral works, and chamber and solo instrumental works. Read more …

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Remembering Pentti Linkola
December 7, 1932 — April 5, 2020

1,120 words

Like other Nordic countries, Finland has a strong conformist mentality. The Law of Jante is in force to keep too headstrong or conflict-seeking individuals in leash. In this respect, it is strange that one of the modern Finnish cultural icons is a character as extreme as Pentti Linkola. Read more …

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Reflections on the Revolution in Spain: Remembering Robert Brasillach (March 31, 1909 – February 6, 1945)

2,169 words

In his memoir Notre avant-guerre, Robert Brasillach tells how his political enthusiasms developed in the years preceding the outbreak of war in September 1939. One of the high points of the story is Brasillach’s 1938 visit to Spain, in order to report on war conditions for his Rightist newspaper in Paris, Je suis partout. Read more …

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The Martyrdom of Robert Brasillach

1,686 words

“The James Dean of French Fascism.”– Alice Kaplan, author of The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach (2001)

Such a description of the puny, bespectacled, and boyish-looking poet — especially coming from the daughter of a Nuremberg prosecutor — seems to be either thinly barbed facetiousness or malignant irony. Read more …

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The Man of the Twentieth Century:
Remembering Ernst Jünger,
March 29, 1895–February 17, 1998

3,554 words

Hungarian translation here; Czech translation here


Audio version: To listen in a player, use the one above or click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.” To subscribe to the CC podcast RSS feed, click here.

Read more …

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The Power of Myth: Remembering Joseph Campbell, March 26, 1904–October 30, 1987

Joseph Campbell & his wife, Jean Erdman Campbell, c. 1939.

2,319 words

Joseph Campbell, the famed teacher of comparative mythology, was born on this day in 1904. For many people, including yours truly, he has served as a “gateway drug” into not only a new way of looking at myths, but into a non-materialistic way of viewing the world. And although as a public figure, Campbell mostly remained apolitical, evidence from his private life indicates that he was at least nominally a “man of the Right.” Read more …

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Remembering Genesis P-Orridge
(February 22nd, 1950 — March 14, 2020)

Throbbing Gristle. From left: Sleazy, Genesis, Cosey, and Chris.

3,071 words

Visual artist, composer, singer, DJ, and general architect of chaos Genesis P-Orridge passed away on March 14, 2020. The Dissident Right shares a surprising amount of common ground with the counterculture icon — and owes some of its aesthetics and methods to them [1] as well.

Born February 22nd, 1950 in Manchester, Neil Andrew Megson adopted the name Genesis P-Orridge — a woo-ish corruption of the word “porridge” — while living in London. Read more …

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Remembering Flannery O’Connor (March 25, 1925 — August 4, 1964)

1,779 words

Like her near-contemporary Gore Vidal (both were born in 1925), the fiction writer Mary Flannery O’Connor had her first brush with fame via a Pathé movie newsreel. She had a pet chicken whom she’d taught to walk backward. Gore’s fame came a few years later when he piloted an airplane, age ten. Read more …

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Approaching D’Annunzio

1,284 words

Reviewing a story collection in 1925, an American critic compared Gabriele d’Annunzio’s influence on the Italian mindset to that of Rudyard Kipling in England. “[T]o understand him is to understand pre-war and immediately post-war Italy.” [1] That sort of remark is almost inaccessible to us today; when we think of the Great War, if we think of the Great War at all, we surely don’t automatically think of Kipling or d’Annunzio. That is one hurdle in approaching d’Annunzio today. Read more …

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Remembering Gabriele D’Annunzio:
March 12, 1863–March 1, 1938

142 words

Today is the birthday of Gabriele D’Annunzio, novelist, poet, playwright, aesthete, dandy, playboy, war hero, and the first fascist dictator, who from 1919 to 1920 ruled over the Adriatic city-state of Fiume, establishing many of the political and aesthetic forms followed by Mussolini a few years later.

To learn more about D’Annunzio’s life and accomplishments, see the following works on this site: Read more …

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Remembering Richard M. Weaver:
March 3, 1910–April 1, 1963

Richard M. Weaver

671 words

America wasn’t always a liberal country. The founders drew more upon classical republicanism than liberalism. In the nineteenth century, the populist movement was decidedly anti-liberal. But the founders and the populists were never consistently anti-liberal, because consistency is the province of intellectuals, not statesmen.

America never had a genuinely anti-liberal intellectual movement until the Southern Agrarians of the 1920s and 1930s. (The North American New Right is America’s second anti-liberal intellectual movement.) Read more …

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Remembering A. R. D. “Rex” Fairburn:
February 2, 1904–March 25, 1957

97 words

Today is the birthday of New Zealand poet, essayist, Social Credit advocate, and social reformer Arthur Rex Dugard Fairburn, another Artist of the Right. In honor of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site.

By Fairburn: Read more …

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Remembering Christopher Tolkien, 1924–2020

Christopher Tolkien

Christopher Tolkien

760 words

J. R. R. Tolkien’s youngest son, Christopher, died on January 15 at the age of 95. Even in old age, Christopher cut a striking scholarly figure, sitting as he did in a green cardigan before a log fire. His reedy voice, occasionally crackling like the dry wood in the stone hearth at his feet, carrying with it subtle wisps of academic gravitas, as smoky shadows curled like grey-blue snakes around a towering bookcase filled with leather-bound tomes Read more …

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Remembering Yukio Mishima:
January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970

700 words

Spanish translation here

Yukio Mishima was one of the giants of 20th-century Japanese literature. He has exercised an enduring influence on the post-World War II European and North American New Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this website:

By Mishima:

Read more …

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Remembering Jack London:
January 12, 1876–November 22, 1916

467 words

Spanish version here

Jack London was born John Griffith Chaney in San Francisco on January 12, 1876. An adventurer and Jack of all trades in his youth, London achieved fame and fortune as a fiction writer and journalist. But he never forgot his working class roots and remained a life-long advocate of workers’ rights, unionism, and revolutionary socialism. (See his essay “What Life Means to Me.”)

Read more …

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Remembering Robinson Jeffers:
January 10, 1887–January 20, 1962

Robinson Jeffers, January 10, 1887–January 20, 1962

274 words

Robinson Jeffers was born on January 10, 1887.

Once regarded as one of the greatest American poets, Jeffers is largely forgotten by the literary establishment today, no doubt because of his politically incorrect subjects and views. A Nietzschean who was accused of fascist sympathies (which he denied), he celebrated nature and the outdoors in his work, eschewing the abstruse modernist style that was fashionable in his day. Read more …

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Remembering Anthony M. Ludovici:
January 8, 1882–April 3, 1971

458 words

Anthony Mario Ludovici was born on January 8, 1882.

Ludovici was one of the first and most accomplished translators of Nietzsche into English and a leading exponent of Nietzsche’s thought. Ludovici was also an original philosopher in his own right. Read more …

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Remembering Alan Watts:
January 6, 1915–November 16, 1973

159 words

Alan Watts was born on this day in 1915. A prolific scholar and dazzling stylist, Watts is best known as the chief popularizer of Asian philosophy for the Beat and Hippy movements, but he was also an original thinker in his own right and a quiet man of the Right. In commemoration of his birth, I wish to draw your attention to these works at Counter-Currents: Read more …

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Remembering J. R. R. Tolkien:
January 3, 1892–September 2, 1973

488 words

“I am in fact a Hobbit.”—J. R. R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien is a favorite author of New Left “hippies” and New Right nationalists, and for pretty much the same reasons. Tolkien deeply distrusted modernization and industrialization, which replace organic reciprocity between man and nature with technological dominion of man over nature, a relationship that deforms and devalues both poles. Read more …

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Remembering Pierre Drieu La Rochelle:
January 3, 1893–March 15, 1945

97 words

Pierre Drieu La Rochelle was born on this day in 1893. In commemoration, I wish to draw your attention to the following works on this site:

Read more …

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Remembering Rudyard Kipling:
December 30, 1865 to January 18, 1936

3,063 words

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

John Collier, Portrait of Rudyard Kipling, circa 1891

Nobel Prize-winning poet and novelist Rudyard Kipling was born on this day in 1865. For an introduction to his life and works, see the following articles on this site.

Read more …

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Remembering H. Keith Thompson:
September 17, 1922–March 3, 2002

The rarely-photographed H. Keith Thompson, Jr. in 1954

988 words

Charles Harold Keith Thompson Jr. (September 17, 1922 – March 3, 2002), more familiarly known as Keith Thompson, was Francis Parker Yockey’s primary US colleague. He was born in Orange, New Jersey of English, German, and Scottish descent. Dr. Hans Thomsen, Keith’s cousin, was the last German chargé d’affaires in Washington DC prior to World War II, and they worked closely together to keep the USA out of the war. At Drew College and Yale, Thompson expressed his opposition to the USA’s having fought in World War I and becoming involved in another war against Germany. Read more …

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