Tag Archives: movie reviews

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Pinocchio:
The Face of Fascism

4,065 words

Extraordinary! There are three—maybe four—Pinocchio films now in development or newly released. They all promise to reveal dark, hitherto unexplored aspects of the famous marionette’s saga. One is a Robert Downey Jr. project that’s been hemming and hawing since about 2012. Initially Downey was planning to play both Geppetto and the title role. Now he’s older, so he’ll just play Geppetto. A new live-action Pinocchio premiered last month in Italy. Read more …

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Midway:
A Different Perspective

3,822 wordsTheatrical release poster for the film Midway.

It was with mixed feelings that I finished reading the highly articulate and skillfully presented review of the film Midway by Robert Hampton. I had similar feelings about the article by Anton.

On the one hand, I heartily agree with their sensible views on the film’s refreshing depictions of American soldiers fighting for a White country, the comparison between Midway and The Patriot, and the rightful place and role of women with White Nationalist and traditionalist overtones. Read more …

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Orwell on Screen

2,340 words

David Ryan
George Orwell on Screen
Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2018

This book took me down a rabbit hole when I discovered it last June. For several days I didn’t want to do anything but watch old television dramatizations and documentaries about George Orwell’s works and life. There have been a surprising number of them, and most of the key ones can be found online or in other digital media. Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 254
Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman

69 words / 53:22

To listen in a player, click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.”

Greg Johnson and John Morgan reconvene our weekly podcast to discuss Martin Scorsese’s latest film, The Irishman.

Read more …

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1917

1,009 words

Set on the battlefields of northern France during the First World War, Sam Mendes’ 1917 follows two lance corporals racing against the clock to deliver a message to a certain colonel ordering him to call off an attack that would result in British defeat. Like Peter Jackson’s 2018 documentary They Shall Not Grow Old, which features colorized footage of the war and audio interviews of former soldiers, it seeks to capture the human side of the war and the everyday realities of a soldier’s life. Read more …

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Uncut Gems

1,289 words

When I left the theater after watching the Safdie brother’s film Uncut Gems, I wanted to take a shower to get all the sleaze off of me. In many ways this is a revolting picture, yet still educational and somewhat red-pilling if approached from the proper mindset. Along with starring NBA basketball star Kevin Garnett as himself, the film’s biggest selling point is the appearance of comic actor Adam Sandler in his first gritty, dramatic role. Read more …

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The Irony of Fate

1,286 words

If you did an internet search of movies about or taking place on New Year’s Eve, the majority would most likely fall under the romantic comedy genre. Which makes sense, given that when you think about New Year’s Eve, your first thoughts are probably of drinking parties with friends, and more importantly, waiting for the clock to strike midnight with your significant other.

The Irony of Fate was a Soviet made-for-television romantic comedy that aired throughout the Soviet Union on January 1st, 1976. Read more …

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Downton Abbey

1,028 words

Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey is an extremely popular British period drama, set in the years 1912 to 1926, which ran six seasons (the Brits call them series) on television and is now a feature film set in 1927.

I very much enjoyed the first two seasons of Downton Abbey. Like many Downton Abbey fans, I felt an intense nostalgia for a country I had never known: George V’s England, an overwhelmingly white, unapologetically Eurocentric society Read more …

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Richard Jewell

1,485 words

Everyone loves a good underdog story. It’s what Hollywood does well. Not to give Hollywood too much credit since I’ll posit that the underdog story is uniquely suited for cinema, regardless if it’s Hollywood or Bollywood or some independent genius shelling out the shekels behind the scenes. I suspect the reason can be boiled down to two words: “home cookin’.” With the right script and performance, filmmakers can get an audience to fall in love with a character despite his personality quirks and manifest flaws. Read more …

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

3,115 words

In memory of Raven.

Even I didn’t expect Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker to be this bad. It is simply a terrible movie: derivative, incoherent, arbitrary, superficial, and deeply boring and uninvolving—despite, or maybe because of, the frenetic action sequences, dazzling duels, and effects so special they’ll leave carbon scoring on your eyeballs. Read more …

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The Mandalorian

1,271 words

“Help us, Dave Filoni. You’re our only hope.”

On December 20th, J. J. “Death Star” Abrams and Disney Corp. will complete the destruction of the Star Wars saga that many of us have loved since childhood, while raking in untold millions by cynically exploiting nostalgia for the mythos they are desecrating. So pass the popcorn, because I’ll be right there, dear readers, to review it for you. Read more …

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Midway:
Fighting for a White Country

1,931 words

It’s shocking Hollywood produced a film like Midway.

The heroes are upstanding white men who fight for their country and not abstract ideals. The good guys are all white, the bad guys are not. There is no question that the good guys are us and the bad guys are the enemy.The women are loyal wives and mothers who uphold traditional gender roles. Courage and patriotism are extolled, not undermined. Read more …

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Look Who’s Back

1,640 words

“Whenever there is a decline of righteousness, and the rise of unrighteousness, then I come back to teach dharma.”—Bhagavad Gita, Chapter IV, Verse 7

“Nobody can stay mad at Hitler forever.”—Look Who’s Back

Read more …

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Ford v Ferrari

1,071 words

Ford v Ferrari depicts the rivalry between Ford and Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966, and follows Ford’s quest to build a car that would break Ferrari’s winning streak. Ford tasks automotive designer Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon) with the challenge of refining the Ford GT40. Shelby is joined by Ken Miles (Christian Bale), a British driver and engineer who also collaborated with him on the Daytona Coupe and the Shelby Cobra 289.

Read more …

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The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance

2,026 words

Warning: contains spoilers.

The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance is an incredible artistic achievement and one of the most ambitious puppet productions ever made. A prequel to Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal (1982) consisting of ten hour-long episodes, the show is faithful to the spirit of its predecessor and explores the universe of Thra in breathtaking detail. Read more …

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“Death My Bride”
David Lynch’s Lost Highway

5,172 words

Lost Highway is probably not a lot of people’s favorite David Lynch film. I would rank it in the lower rungs of his canon. But it is still a masterful film that draws me back again and again.

The big question about Lost Highway is what actually happens. This movie has a plot that you can fully summarize without really spoiling it, because the meaning is never really given away. Read more …

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The Lighthouse:
A Review

1,306 words

What is the difference between a “psychological” horror movie and all the other kinds of horror movies? Probably in how slow-paced and bizarre the director is willing to make his final product. The Lighthouse, directed by Robert Eggers and featuring Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattison, is a tall, creaking, alien edifice of the bizarre. And as with many a good psychological thriller, The Lighthouse offers several levels of exquisitely-rendered weirdness and forces the audience to figure out which level it’s on at any given point. Read more …

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First They Came for John Demjanjuk . . .

2,778 words

The Devil Next Door (2019)
Directed by Yossi Bloch & Daniel Sivan

. . . but I wasn’t a Ukrainian accused of being a Nazi prison guard, so I did not speak out. In the 1980s, John Demjanjuk (1920–2012) was a retired auto worker living near Cleveland, Ohio who was accused of having been an exceptionally cruel SS prison guard called “Ivan the Terrible” by prison inmates at the Treblinka death camp in Poland. Read more …

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Norwegian Disaster Movies:
Fictional & Actual

3,390 words

What is it about disaster movies that we find so fascinating? In real life we do everything we possibly can to avoid being in a disaster, yet we can happily spend an hour or two watching people suffering in the most horrific situations on a screen. But this is also the very reason we love a good disaster movie: They remind us that we live in a broken, fallen world. Some disasters we bring on ourselves, some are inflicted on us by others, and others are what used to be called “acts of God.” Read more …

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“Roy, We Hardly Knew Ye”:
Roy Cohn & the Secret History of America

2,918 words

Where’s My Roy Cohn?
Directed by Matt Tyrnauer
Interviews and archival footage of Ken Auletta, Roy M. Cohn, Joseph McCarthy, Anne Roiphe, Steve Rubell, Roger Stone, Donald Trump, & Barbara Walters

“I bring out the worst in my enemies and that’s how I get them to defeat themselves.” — Roy Cohn

Read more …

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Flying Phantom Ship Asks Cui Bono?

2,433 words

The prolific manga artist Shotaro Ishinomori (1938-1998) spent his formative years in the Second World War and its immediate aftermath. At just 16, he published his first manga, and at 18 he became an assistant to the “God of Manga,” Osamu Tezuka, where he worked on Tetsuwan Atom (Astro Boy). He was likely influenced by Tezuka’s desire to help heal Japan after the war, with the latter’s Astro Boy personifying atomic energy’s non-destructive potential. Read more …

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I am Mother

1,618 words

How do you break into Hollywood? Director Grant Sputore and writer Michael Lloyd Green might have a few tips for you in their first full-length feature film for Netflix. Released in 2019, their debut, I am Mother, does all it can to please the Hollywood elite and bring a warm glow of smug satisfaction into the bleeding hearts of their old college professors.

It takes a man to write a great feminist movie, and with their all-female cast, these two guys lay it on twice as thick. Read more …

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Imitation of Life & an Imitation of Imitation of Life

4,134 words

We live an age where no one wants to be white if they can help it. That’s why you have honkies like Robert “Beto” O’Rourke pretending be Hispanic, Shaun King pretending to be black, and Elizabeth Warren pretending to be Native American. But it was not so long ago when the opposite was true, and it was non-whites who, if possible, tried to pass themselves off as whites. Imitation of Life is a movie about the latter. Read more …

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Roger Waters’ Us + Them

1,670 words

I gotta admit that I’m a little bit confused.
Sometimes it seems to me as if I’m just being used.

–“Dogs,” Animals, Pink Floyd (1977)

In this documentary, Roger Waters constantly struts about the stage like an aged and anorexic Richard Gere, his spindly arms held defiantly aloft in a clichéd clenched-fist salute of solidarity with the people. Read more …

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The Great Alaskan Race

1,501 words

It’s always nice when a film presupposes that empathy is a universal human trait. Films that do this rarely go much beyond being merely nice, however. They tend to cling to their PG rating and their predictable story arcs until the obligatory uplifting ending. There is good in all of us, and if we’re just honest with ourselves and God, redemption can appear almost like a present at Christmas. Read more …

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Rambo: Last Blood

3,590 words

Have you ever wanted to watch a movie where a 72-year-old man engages in gratuitous violence against racially-defined enemies? Rambo: Last Blood delivers. In this world of remakes, reboots, and endless installments of cash-cow franchises, Rambo: Last Blood is refreshingly current and lucid, even if it is a product of its time and rehashing culture.

Now, when I say current and lucid, I’m not gonna say fresh. The film is an Irish stew of plot devices that is surprisingly nourishing. Read more …

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Memory: The Origins of Alien

2,076 words

Director Alexandre O. Philippe has followed up his 2017 documentary on the shower scene in Psycho (78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene) with Memory: The Origins of Alien, a documentary on the creation of Alien that attempts to chart the film’s wide-ranging influences and explore its mythic resonance. The result is an underwhelming muddle that lacks direction and often retreads old ground, particularly in an overlong segment on the chestburster scene. Read more …

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s

1,899 words

Blake Edwards’ 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s—loosely based on Truman Capote’s 1958 novel of the same name—stars Audrey Hepburn in her iconic role of Holly Golightly, a charming, flighty, feminine, haunted young woman trying to create a life—and an identity—in a gorgeous Technicolor New York City at what is arguably the peak of American civilization, just before the plunge.

Read more …

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Blade Runner 2049: White Slavery

3,496 words

Blade Runner 2049 is a deep and interesting film fueled by visual spectacle and cleverly-handled ambiguity. The film’s dialogue is sparse and carefully weighted, and the intricate plot resolves itself fairly satisfactorily (even though the film takes its sweet time getting there). Nonetheless, it fails to live up to its predecessor. It struggles to make headway with the theological commentary of the original – lines about Replicants being “angels” are unjustified, and are thankfully marginal. Read more …

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Travis Bickle, American Hero

2,254 words

Taxi Driver is the defining film for every bastard child of our times. How many men today can relate to Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), a fucked up, lonely loser trying to make rent and find love in a disgusting, criminal, and uncaring concrete hive? The guy is nuts, but who could blame him? Why would anybody be normal in the world he inhabits? His job is dumb, his apartment small, and his surroundings hostile. Read more …

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