Tag Archives: Trevor Lynch

Print this post Print this post

Valerian & the City of a Thousand Planets

611 words

Valerian? Isn’t that a root one chews to fall asleep?

I saw Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element near the end of its run in the theaters, and it was love at first frame. I loved its Manichean/ancient astronauts plot, unique and dazzling visual style (imagine the Coen brothers remaking Barbarella), the madcap action, blond Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman’s Zorg (an evil Ross Perot with slightly displaced Hitler hair and Fu Manchu’s wardrobe), Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | 9 Responses
Print this post Print this post

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk

628 words

Dunkirk is Christopher Nolan’s most emotionally powerful movie. It deals with the evacuation of 400,000 British, Canadian, and French troops trapped on the beach at Dunkirk after being defeated by the Germans in the Second World War.

Dunkirk is a strange work, especially for Christopher Nolan, who typically directs long films with complex plots, extensive character development, and lots of dialogue. Dunkirk, however, is only 106 minutes long. There is no single storyline. Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , | 10 Responses
Print this post Print this post

The Promise

1,024 words

When the Young Turk government dragged the Ottoman Empire into the First World War on the side of the Central Powers, their aim was to create a pan-Turkic empire incorporating Turkic lands that were part of the Russian Empire. A major impediment to these plans were the Christian minorities of Eastern Anatolia: the Armenians, Greeks, and Assyrians, who naturally looked to Russia as a potential ally and protector. Thus the Young Turks hatched a plan to exterminate these groups.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Watchmen

4,702 words

Watchmen is one of the most thoroughly Right-wing, even fascistic works of recent popular culture, despite the right-thinking Leftism of the creators of the original graphic novel, Alan Moore, who wrote the story, and Dave Gibbons, who illustrated it—and of Zack Snyder, who directed the movie adaptation, which to my mind is the greatest superhero movie of all time, a movie that not only does justice to the original novel but actually improves upon it in fundamental ways.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Hidden Figures

1,135 words

Hidden Figures, a.k.a., We Wuz Astronautz, tells the story of three black women who worked at NASA in 1961 struggling for equal rights both as blacks and as women. The movie tells us that it is “based on true events,” and the three women — mathematician Katherine Johnson, computer programmer Dorothy Vaughan, and engineer Mary Jackson — actually did exist. But it is not clear if any of the struggles and achievements depicted actually happened, or if they are just-so stories. The moral of the movie, however, is quite clear: three unsung black women played an essential role in the US space program.  Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Silence

971 words

Martin Scorsese’s Silence is a very fine film that seems to belong to an entirely different world. Imagine what American movies would be like if our film industry were not controlled by hostile and decadent aliens who have weaponized the medium against European man and culture. Silence is such a film. It is wholly untouched by political correctness and white guilt or self-abasement. Instead, Silence is the story of self-confident, expansionist whites battling non-white savagery.

Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Passengers

676 words / 4:30

Minor spoilers

Audio version: To listen in a player, click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

Passengers, directed by the Norwegian Morten Tyldum, is the best science fiction movie of the current season, so if you have seen Rogue One or are simply skipping it, you have an even better option. Read more …

Posted in Counter-Currents Radio, North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Now Expanded & in Audio Version
Rogue One

1,607 words / 9:09

Warning: a few minor spoilers

Audio version: To listen in a player, click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

Rogue One is quite simply the best Star Wars movie ever. It has an interesting plot, a tight script, good pacing, uniformly good acting, excellent special effects, amazing sets, spectacular new worlds, and dazzling battle scenes. I really loved this movie.  Read more …

Posted in Counter-Currents Radio, North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Denial

denial1,692 words

Denial is a very boring and deceptive movie about a legal case, David Irving v Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, in which British World War II historian David Irving sued American Jewish historian Deborah Lipstadt and her British publisher for libel over allegations made in her 1993 book Denying the Holocaust, in which she accused Irving of being a “Holocaust denier” and a bad historian who distorted history to conform with his ideological agenda, namely the vindication of Adolf Hitler.  Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed
Print this post Print this post

Star Trek: Beyond

Beyond1,184 words

I have seen a lot of Star Trek on the big and small screens, and from the perspective of middle age, it seems like an appalling waste of time. Recently, I watched a number of episodes from the original series, which I had not seen since childhood, and found them quite creaky and often laughable. My feelings about the original cast surfaced when I saw Walter Koening appear on an episode of Babylon Five (yes, it was awful, but I gave it a chance!), and I blurted out, “Science fiction will not be safe until all these people are dead.”  Read more …

Posted in North American New Right | Also tagged , , , , | Comments closed
    Kindle Subscription
  • EXSURGO Apparel

    Our Titles

    The Importance of James Bond

    In Defense of Prejudice

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater (2nd ed.)

    The Hypocrisies of Heaven

    Waking Up from the American Dream

    Green Nazis in Space!

    Truth, Justice, and a Nice White Country

    Heidegger in Chicago

    The End of an Era

    Sexual Utopia in Power

    What is a Rune? & Other Essays

    Son of Trevor Lynch's White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    The Lightning & the Sun

    The Eldritch Evola

    Western Civilization Bites Back

    New Right vs. Old Right

    Lost Violent Souls

    Journey Late at Night: Poems and Translations

    The Non-Hindu Indians & Indian Unity

    Baader Meinhof ceramic pistol, Charles Kraaft 2013

    Jonathan Bowden as Dirty Harry

    The Lost Philosopher, Second Expanded Edition

    Trevor Lynch's A White Nationalist Guide to the Movies

    And Time Rolls On

    The Homo & the Negro

    Artists of the Right

    North American New Right, Vol. 1

    Forever and Ever

    Some Thoughts on Hitler

    Tikkun Olam and Other Poems

    Under the Nihil

    Summoning the Gods

    Hold Back This Day

    The Columbine Pilgrim

    Confessions of a Reluctant Hater

    Taking Our Own Side

    Toward the White Republic

    Distributed Titles

    Tyr, Vol. 4

    Reuben

    The Node

    A Sky Without Eagles

    The Way of Men

    The New Austerities

    Morning Crafts

    Siege

    Asatru: A Native European Spirituality

    The Prison Notes

    Standardbearers

    Tyr

    The Lost Philosopher

    Impeachment of Man

    Gold in the Furnace

    Defiance

    The Passing of a Profit & Other Forgotten Stories