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Me ne frego
Episode 28: Enoch Powell, & A Clockwork Orange

122 words / 1:40:25

Co-hosts Fróði Midjord and Jonas De Geer were joined by Counter-Currents Book Editor John Morgan for today’s broadcast, which commemorated two recent anniversaries: Enoch Powell’s “Rivers of Blood” speech opposing mass immigration into the United Kingdom, which was given fifty years ago on April 20, and the release of Stanley Kubrick’s film, A Clockwork Orange, in Europe in April 1971. We discussed the importance of Powell’s speech, and the “Old Right” more generally, and then discussed the differences between Anthony Burgess’ novel and the film, and in particular their views of human nature and neoliberal attempts to modify and control it, as well as other recent films which have dealt with related themes.

Listen to “Me ne frego – episode 28, with John Morgan on ‘A Clockwork Orange'” on Spreaker.

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5 Comments

  1. Oleg
    Posted May 7, 2018 at 9:47 pm | Permalink

    How can we download these podcasts?

    • Posted May 8, 2018 at 3:19 am | Permalink

      If you go to the page on Spreaker, there is a download link.

  2. R_Moreland
    Posted May 7, 2018 at 1:41 am | Permalink

    “What is life? Work followed by television.” – Anthony Burgess in 1985.

    A point which Burgess makes is that a de facto totalitarian society would channel the ultraviolence of youth into organized putting in the “boot” on behalf of the state. The mayhem keeps average citizens off the streets and away from dissenting, but then why go out when the world is brought to your living room courtesy of X number of telescreen, I mean television, channels?

    We can draw any number of analogies with today’s infotainment-industrial-complex, atomized consumerism, and System sponsored leftist violence plus NGO subversions. Use nadsats against natbols and all that sort of thing.

    And was the Ludovico treatment connected to British nationalist-traditionalist Anthony Ludovici?

    • Gladiator
      Posted May 8, 2018 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

      I had the honor of meeting and getting to know Mr. Burgess. He lived on an Island in the Med and hearing that he ran a foul with the church censorship then, in 1968. I was too young to understand where he was coming from. But after all these years, since I re-read his works I think he was another anti- post modern nihilist!

  3. Pietas
    Posted May 6, 2018 at 10:25 pm | Permalink

    Good podcast. Frego is always superb. I think you are right in your interpretation of the Room. I wondered about this but yes— he represents the Muslim or gypsy pickpockets as european in an early scene. (This was about the point I gagged and stopped watching attentively.). But then he continues the trope with the monkey man, wherein it twists from ridiculously pc to subversive. It’s about the immigrant rape crisis. Why are u allowing wild animals in our midst? The way it’s left out there with no connection to the rest of the flick emphasizes its significance. The depiction of abstract art is intended as satirical, then. Still, I didn’t find it to have enjoyability.
    Another movie that I thot had this sort of “deep”, or cryptic subtext was It Follows, a low budget horror. I thot it had a message of white flight and what really destroyed Detroit, but perhaps I was reading it in. But then that soiled sinema guy said the same thing—he is most perceptive—so I feel more confident. But these messages, if we are correct, are lost on 99.9% of viewers.

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