Tag Archives: movie reviews

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I Wake Up Screaming:
My Top Ten Halloween Horror Flick Picks

2,284 words

It’s not clear why human beings enjoy being frightened. Indeed, in most circumstances we don’t. I find nothing particularly “thrilling,” for example, about the frightening threat posed by mass non-white migration into the lands of my ancestors. Nor do I enjoy how I feel when I’m the only white person on the J train at midnight. But I thoroughly enjoy the imaginary threats posed by ghosts, witches, and vampires. There’s a lot to be said here about the human fascination with the uncanny, and what it reveals about us. Read more …

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Brawl in Cell Block 99

6,764 words

Brawl in Cell Block 99 (2017), a new film by writer/director S. Craig Zahler and which stars Vince Vaughn in the lead, enters the canon of recent films and TV shows dealing symbolically with the plight of white men in contemporary America. This theme is explored through the protagonist’s surface-level patriotism, antagonisms between Mexicans and Anglos, and through the allegory of a beaten-down Christianity, as embodied in the character of Bradley Thomas (Vince Vaughn).  Read more …

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Rashomon & Realism

3,476 words

Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950) is commonly found on lists of the world’s greatest movies, and deservedly so. Rashomon features avant-garde narrative techniques (flashbacks, multiple points of view), dynamic black-and-white cinematography by Kazuo Miyagawa, compelling Ravel-like music by Fumio Hayasaka, subtle and intensely dramatic performances, and a complex but tightly edited script, all combined into a fast-paced 88-minute masterpiece with an emotionally devastating climax. Read more …

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Blade Runner 2049: Faust Part II

1,428 words

American popular culture is vile, degenerate, and a substance so toxic that it should only be kept within the Level 5 containment vault of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta next to the Petri dish that contains the only remaining sample of smallpox. The typical Hollywood movie is an offense to morality, the senses, and the intellect. Only a handful of post-1960 movies can be said to achieve the status of art. Curiously, one of these is the original Blade Runner of 1982.

Read more …

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Blade Runner 2049

987 words

It is dangerous work, making a sequel to a classic like Blade Runner, Ridley Scott’s 1982 magnum opus. French Canadian director Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049 is a very good film, but it inevitably falls short of the original.

I first discovered Villeneuve’s work with his 2016 science fiction film Arrival (discussed with John Morgan here). Arrival impressed me as a highly imaginative science fiction film with an original visual style, told with an appealingly deliberate art-film pacing, with a stunning plot twist and a powerful emotional payoff. Read more …

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Blade Runner

blade_runner_xlg2,593 words

Czech translation here

Ridley Scott’s 1982 movie Blade Runner is a science fiction classic and surely the director’s finest work. Blade Runner excels on all levels. It is a highly imaginative vision of the future realized with a stunning visual style. The script is intelligent, even poetic. The cast is uniformly strong, with a number of powerful performances, particularly Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty. The gripping action sequences are acrobatic, balletic, and brutal. But the key to the film’s unsettling emotional power is its deep mythic subtext. Read more …

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M. Night Shyamalan’s Flawed Masterpiece The Village

1,160 words

The Village
Written & Directed by M. Night Shyamalan
Music by James Newton Howard
Starring Bryce Dallas Howard, Joaquin Phoenix, Adrien Brody, William Hurt, Brendon Gleeson, Cherry Jones, Sigourney Weaver, et al.
2004

Audiences and critics left theaters showing M. Night Shyamalan’s film The Village (2004) disappointed, polarized, or uncertain of this flawed masterpiece. Read more …

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Ridley Scott’s Prometheus

979 words

Editor’s Note:

After reviewing Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant, Buttercup Dew decided to revisit its prequel, Prometheus. — Greg Johnson

Prometheus, an omen of the atrocity to come that was Diversity Awakens, is an example of how box office anticipation can propel a franchise into the hands of saboteurs. Unlike the tightly scripted, self-contained stories of the original Alien and exhausting Aliens, Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 195
Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar

442 words / 57:55

To listen in a player, click here. To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save link as” or “save target as.” To subscribe to the CC podcast RSS feed, click here.

Read more …

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Cronenberg’s Crash

2,219 words

I remember the moment in 1996 when I first heard about David Cronenberg’s Crash on National Public Radio. I exploded in outrage. I thought the story of a group of people who made a sexual fetish of car crashes had to be the stupidest movie concept of all time. Not decadent or perverted, mind you—although it was obviously trying really hard in that respect—but just stupid. I had the sense that Western decadence, like a 16,000-page burlesque by the Marquis de Sade, was finally running out of perversions, Read more …

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Citizen Czech:
A Study in Crypsistic Cinema

3,617 words

Death of a Scoundrel (1956)
Written, directed, and produced by Charles Martin
Music by Max Steiner
Cinematography by James Wong Howe
Stars: George Sanders, Yvonne De Carlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor, John Hoyt, Tom Conway, Werner Klemperer

“He was the most hated man on earth, but he could have been one of the great men in history. He was a genius.”

Read more …

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Alien: Covenant

918 words

I saw Alien: Covenant on the big screen this summer in Budapest. I didn’t write a review then, because another reviewer had it covered. But having seen it for a second time, now on Blu-ray, I feel moved to comment.

Covenant is an excellent film, indeed the best in the series since Scott started it with his path-breaking Alien (1979) — although James Cameron’s Aliens is excellent and iconic in its own right. Read more …

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Remembering Leni Riefenstahl:
August 22, 1902–September 8, 2003

leni1_thumb[1]769 words

German translation here

Helene Bertha Amalie “Leni” Riefenstahl was born on this day in Berlin in 1902. She died in Pöcking, Bavaria, on September 8, 2003, just after her 101st birthday. She was a highly accomplished dancer, actress, photographer, and film director. 

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Princess Mononoke

890 words

I feel like the skinhead who went to see Cats because he’d heard that T. S. Eliot was a fascist.

Japanese cartoons are very popular in our circles. They have even been reviewed at Counter-Currents. The closest thing I had seen to a Japanese cartoon is Twilight of the Cockroaches. But that mixed animation and live action, and it was more than 25 years ago, so I remember almost nothing about it. Read more …

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War for the Planet of the Apes

1,504 words

War for the Planet of the Apes is the third film of the rebooted series and one of the best. With its austere visual palette and dark tonal mood it could so easily have been a flawless masterpiece. Unfortunately, a couple of trivial missteps get in the way of its overall quality and undermine the film’s otherwise brutal solemnity.

War begins 15 years after the simian flu outbreak that wiped out much of the human species. Read more …

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Valerian & the City of a Thousand Planets

611 words

Valerian? Isn’t that a root one chews to fall asleep?

I saw Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element near the end of its run in the theaters, and it was love at first frame. I loved its Manichean/ancient astronauts plot, unique and dazzling visual style (imagine the Coen brothers remaking Barbarella), the madcap action, blond Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman’s Zorg (an evil Ross Perot with slightly displaced Hitler hair and Fu Manchu’s wardrobe), Read more …

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Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk

628 words

Czech version here

Dunkirk is Christopher Nolan’s most emotionally powerful movie. It deals with the evacuation of 400,000 British, Canadian, and French troops trapped on the beach at Dunkirk after being defeated by the Germans in the Second World War.

Dunkirk is a strange work, especially for Christopher Nolan, who typically directs long films with complex plots, extensive character development, and lots of dialogue. Dunkirk, however, is only 106 minutes long. Read more …

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The Bad War—in Black & White

2,244 words

The Victors
Directed by Carl Foreman
Starring George Hamilton, George Peppard, Eli Wallach, et al.
1963

In American culture today, there is a sticky-sweet worship of veterans that is about as enjoyable to experience as stepping barefoot on the dried-up syrup from a spilled soda pop on the concrete surface of a rundown public pool. The worst of this veteran worship involves the veneration of veterans of World War II. Read more …

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Giant: A Dual-Edged “Modern” Western

2,446 words

Giant
Directed by George Stevens
Starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean
1956

Giant is filmed in the beautiful but desolate wildlands near Marfa, Texas[1] by the excellent director George Stevens (1904–1976), who also directed the award-winning movie Shane (1953). Giant is based on a book of the same name by Jewish author, Edna Ferber (1885–1968).  Read more …

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Shinsekai Yori & the Impossibility of Coexistence

Squealer

2,528 words

Reviewing anime for a White Nationalist site can be hard, for the want of good subject matter. There are infinite complaints that can be made against mainstream anime that reflects Western memes. Read more …

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Alien: Covenant:
An Anti-Semitic Allegory

2,213 words

Alien: Covenant is a masterfully crafted film from an experienced and subtle director. If you haven’t already seen it, I recommend this movie, as it has plenty to offer, ranging from gorgeous and eerie landscapes to White Nationalist dog-whistles. Much of the movie is shot with physical sets and props, giving a grungy, grimy, authentic feel to the cinematography. The spacesuits, xenomorphs, post-apocalyptic landscapes and crashed or ill-fated landers are all built on real sets and the raw solidity of it bleeds through. Read more …

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Looking for Pop

3,353 words

Jef Costello
The Importance of James Bond & Other Essays
San Francisco: Counter-Currents, 2017

“Where was that stooped and mealy-colored old man I used to call Poppa when the merry-go-round broke down?”[1]

“This guy can’t possibly live up to the song they wrote about him… probably just an accountant named Wallace.”[2] Read more …

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The Antifa Set to Rhythm & Blues

2,174 words

The Blues Brothers
Directed by John Landis
Starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd
1980

Occasionally there is domestic political violence in the United States. For example, the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago was a violent contest Read more …

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The Promise

1,024 words

When the Young Turk government dragged the Ottoman Empire into the First World War on the side of the Central Powers, their aim was to create a pan-Turkic empire incorporating Turkic lands that were part of the Russian Empire. A major impediment to these plans were the Christian minorities of Eastern Anatolia: the Armenians, Greeks, and Assyrians, who naturally looked to Russia as a potential ally and protector. Thus the Young Turks hatched a plan to exterminate these groups.

Read more …

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Watchmen

4,702 words

Watchmen is one of the most thoroughly Right-wing, even fascistic works of recent popular culture, despite the right-thinking Leftism of the creators of the original graphic novel, Alan Moore, who wrote the story, and Dave Gibbons, who illustrated it—and of Zack Snyder, who directed the movie adaptation, which to my mind is the greatest superhero movie of all time, a movie that not only does justice to the original novel but actually improves upon it in fundamental ways.

Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 175
Greg Johnson & John Morgan
Martin Scorsese’s Silence

42 words / 55:52

To listen in a player, click here.

To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 172
Space: A Dream Deferred
Greg Johnson & Paul Kersey on Hidden Figures

64:30 / 119 words

To listen in a player, click here.

To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

To subscribe to our podcasts, click here for iTunes and here for RSS.  Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 171
Greg Johnson & John Morgan
The Films of David Lynch, Part 2

85:24 / 64 words

Part 2 of 2

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To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

To subscribe to our podcasts, click here for iTunes and here for RSS.

Greg Johnson and John Morgan conclude their discussion of the films of David Lynch. Read more …

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Counter-Currents Radio Podcast No. 170
Greg Johnson & John Morgan
The Films of David Lynch, Part 1

63:54 / 88 words

Part 1 of 2

To listen in a player, click here.

To download the mp3, right-click here and choose “save target or link as.”

To subscribe to our podcasts, click here for iTunes and here for RSS.

Greg Johnson and John Morgan discuss the films of David Lynch. Read more …

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Hidden Figures

1,135 words

Hidden Figures, a.k.a., We Wuz Astronautz, tells the story of three black women who worked at NASA in 1961 struggling for equal rights both as blacks and as women. The movie tells us that it is “based on true events,” and the three women — mathematician Katherine Johnson, computer programmer Dorothy Vaughan, and engineer Mary Jackson — actually did exist. But it is not clear if any of the struggles and achievements depicted actually happened, or if they are just-so stories. The moral of the movie, however, is quite clear: three unsung black women played an essential role in the US space program.  Read more …

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